Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

TigerHug

Image gallery | March 10, 2014

Photos from the orangutan cemetery

Blog entry by Michael Hedelain | March 5, 2014

Bones from an orangutan near Tanjung Puting National Park ©   ULET IFANSASTI Proctor & Gamble claims that an astonishing 4.8 billion people worldwide use their products, which include anti-dandruff shampoo Head & Shoulders. What...

Clean palm oil can help save the world's wildlife

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | March 3, 2014

Nearly 400,000 of you have joined us to demand the products you use are forest and tiger-friendly. We don’t believe that the products we use every day should contribute to the destruction of precious habitat for animals. That’s why we...

Pep up your Valentine's day with these quirky e-cards

Blog entry by Johanna Fernandez and Jenny Tuazon | February 13, 2014

Who says environmental activists can’t pull off pick-up lines? For the mushiest, soppiest time of the year, we rounded up some eco-friendly conversation openers that you can use, whether you’re looking to woo that special someone or...

The movement for tiger-friendly products starts today. Are you in?

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | February 12, 2014

Today we are drawing a line in the sand to protect our forests. Thousands of concerned consumers in Indonesia and around the world are joining celebrities such as Joaquin Phoenix , Paul Wesley, Gillian Anderson and Kellan...

Will you help us Protect Paradise in 2014?

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | January 24, 2014

When I read the daily newspaper here in Indonesia, it’s rare that there is not at least one big scandal or exposé related to the forest sector. Just this last weekend, land conflicts in a Kalimantan palm oil plantation made regional...

Year 2013 in Pictures

Image gallery | December 31, 2013

There is power in connectivity

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | December 30, 2013

A snapshot of the year that came to pass and the wonderful things that Greenpeace were able to accomplish would not have been possible if not for your generous extension of your time, skills and resources to help us make our vision of...

Protect Paradise

Image gallery | November 15, 2013

Licence to kill

Publication | October 22, 2013 at 11:00

As few as 400 tigers are thought to remain in the rainforests of Sumatra, which are vanishing at a staggering rate – a quarter of a million hectares every year. Expansion of oil palm and pulpwood plantations was responsible for nearly two-thirds...

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