Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

Certifying Destruction

Publication | September 3, 2013 at 11:00

Oil palm plantations are the largest driver of deforestation in Indonesia.

Sailing through the world’s richest waters – Rainbow Warrior arrives in Indonesia

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | May 9, 2013

I grew up in West Papua, which sits in the far west of the world’s biggest archipelago. I studied forestry in the province’s capital, but grew up in another city called Jayapura. If West Papua is considered frontier land, then Jayapura...

APP commits to end deforestation!

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | February 6, 2013 1 comment

Today was a day I have at times feared might never come, but I’ve just emerged from a packed press conference in Jakarta for the launch of Asia Pulp & Paper’s new ‘Forest Conservation Policy’ aimed to end its involvement in...

2012 In Pictures

Image gallery | January 1, 2013

Cleaning up KFC's act

Blog entry by jtuazon | August 10, 2012

Don’t you wish they’d clean up better outside fast food restaurants? Greenpeace went and did some cleaning, although maybe not the kind you’d expect. Outside the front of a KFC restaurant in Los Angeles, Greenpeace washed the...

KFC’s secret recipe: forest destruction?

Image | June 5, 2012 at 14:38

Greenpeace activists dressed as tigers, formed a dancing flash mob in front of a KFC outlet in central Quezon City to call out the fastfood company on its secret recipe: "forest destruction." Greenpeace, is calling on KFC and its parent company...

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Homeless tigers lost in the concrete jungles of Manila

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | June 4, 2012 1 comment

Imagine seeing Sumatran tigers roaming the concrete jungles of Metro Manila  — wandering aimlessly across its busy streets homeless, searching of refuge. Such a picture may seem far fetched for many, but ironically truth may be...

Flash mob at KFC

Image gallery | June 2, 2012

KFC’s Secret Recipe: Rainforest Destruction

Blog entry by Ian Duff | May 23, 2012

No matter what you think about fast food, you’ll no doubt agree that rainforests shouldn’t be trashed to make packaging destined for the trash. But  that’s exactly what’s happening. Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) is supplying KFC with...

Asia Pulp & Paper in illegal rainforest scandal

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | March 1, 2012

APP: “Zero tolerance for illegal wood." - @AsiaPulpPaper These are the five words that say a lot but apparently mean little to a company that has made a mantra out of repeating something which is simply not true.  And today,...

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