Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

Save Baguio trees 2-day protest

Image gallery | February 9, 2012

Politicians Listen to the Polluters at UN climate talks

Feature story | December 11, 2011 at 17:27

UN climate talks in Durban have ended the same way they began, in failure. Governments at the UN climate talks have chosen to listen to the polluters over the people and failed to reinforce previous climate saving measures and have steered clear...

Durban Climate Talks: Last chance for the US

Feature story | November 27, 2011 at 12:30

On the eve of the latest round of climate talks in Durban, Greenpeace declares that it is time for our governments to listen to the people, and not the polluters.

You can close our office, but you can’t stop us

Blog entry by Nur Hidayati, Greenpeace Indonesia | November 11, 2011

We have  been warned that we may have to move out of our office in Jakarta early next week. This is the office that has been leading our campaign to stop Asia Pulp and Paper destroying the rainforests of Indonesia . But, in...

Asia Pulp and Paper's sinking reputation forces more companies to jump ship -...

Blog entry by Jamie Woolley, Greenpeace UK | November 2, 2011

There's further bad news for Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) as yet more companies around the world ditch their contracts with the unscrupulous forest-trashing company. Hot on the heels of Mattel and Lego, today Hasbro announced a new...

Success: Barbie and Mattel drop deforestation!

Blog entry by Laura Kenyon, Greenpeace International | October 5, 2011

We all know that break ups are hard. Especially when they involve secrets – like the shameful secret that broke up Barbie and Ken back in June: she had destroyed rainforest in her toy packaging. Her manufacturer, Mattel, was using...

How the toy sector and APP are responding to our Indonesia forest campaign

Blog entry by Zulfahmi | June 14, 2011

It’s been a busy few days since the latest phase of our campaign to stop deforestation in Indonesia got underway. There are now signs that both Mattel and Lego are preparing to make changes in the way they buy their packaging. ...

Uninspired implementation of environmental laws hinders SEA from leading the world in...

Blog entry by JP Agcaoili | June 8, 2011

ASEAN member states could be the world leaders in sustainable development.  We could be the prime example of how the protection of our natural resources benefits not just the world, but contributes largely as well to national progress...

Nestlé needs to give rainforests a break

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | March 18, 2010 6 comments

Need a break? Before you have one with a Kit Kat watch this video – ' Have a break? ' We need your help to get the rainforests a break and to help you spread the word we’ve launched this video spoof. It exposes the true cost behind...

Nestlé is buying palm oil from companies

Image | March 18, 2010 at 17:54

Nestlé is buying palm oil from companies who are destroying orang-utan habitat.

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