Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

Nestlé is buying palm oil from companies

Image | March 18, 2010 at 17:54

Nestlé is buying palm oil from companies who are destroying orang-utan habitat.

Nestlé drives rainforest destruction pushing orang-utans to brink of extinction

Feature story | March 18, 2010 at 7:00

Nestlé is using palm oil from destroyed Indonesian rainforests and peatlands, in products like KitKat, pushing already endangered orang-utans to the brink of extinction and accelerating climate change, a new Greenpeace report reveals. (1)

Greenpeace presents ‘World Cup of Forest Destruction’ to SBY

Feature story | January 26, 2010 at 7:00

Greenpeace activists today presented the ‘World Cup of Forest Destruction’ to Indonesia’s President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, outside the Jakarta Convention Centre, where the real Jules Rimet Trophy is on public display.

Code REDD

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | December 15, 2009

Discussions at these climate talks are often in a highly specialized language that some of us like to call “Alphabet Soup” – because it is conducted almost entirely in acronyms. One such cup o’ soup we’ve been hearing a lot about...

Notes from the top (of a crane)….

Blog entry by Lea Guerrero | November 28, 2009

Filipino Greenpeace activist Joel has spent more than 9 hours on top of a crane in the port of a massive pulp facility in Riau.  Earlier, his team, along with 10 other activists shut down the entire export facility of the mill owned by...

Greenpeace ends 27 hour dramatic non violent direct action in Riau

Feature story | November 26, 2009 at 7:00

Greenpeace today ended a 26-hour dramatic non-violent direct action at the loading facility of Sinar Mas subsidiary Asia Pulp and Paper (APP) owned pulp and paper mill. Sinar Mas has been tagged by the group as a leading forest and climate...

Greenpeace activists hang a banner reading

Image | November 26, 2009 at 7:00

Greenpeace activists hang a banner reading "Climate Crime" from the top of a loading crane in the port of a major pulp mill facility in Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia.

Our Climate Defenders are at it again - Pulp exports halted at climate change's...

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 25, 2009

The climate can’t wait, the remaining Indonesian forest can’t wait, and today Greenpeace sent a strong message to world leaders by blocking the Asia Pulp & Paper mill in the heart of the Indonesian forest. This mill is a massive...

Climate destroyer shut down by activists in Indonesian rainforest ahead of...

Feature story | November 25, 2009 at 7:00

With just 12 days before the critical UN Copenhagen Climate Summit, we are taking direct action again today - blocking one of the world's largest pulp mills, in the heart of Indonesia's rainforests. The export facilities have been shutdown by our...

12 Days left to avert climate chaos

Feature story | November 25, 2009 at 7:00

Twelve days before the critical UN Copenhagen Climate Summit, today Greenpeace activists shut down the export facilities of a major pulp mill operated by Sinar Mas owned pulp and paper company APP in the heart of Indonesia's rainforests. Sinar...

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