Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

A Good Treaty for Forests at Copenhagen

Publication | November 25, 2009 at 8:00

Tropical forest destruction is responsible for about a fifth of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions – more than emission from all the world’s cars, planes, and trains put together. Consequently, stopping forest destruction is one of the...

Success at Climate Defenders Camp

Feature story | November 24, 2009 at 7:00

Our activists at the Climate Defenders Camp in Indonesia have had an tough time lately. Many of them have been arrested, interrogated and deported - along with independent journalists. At one point police even tried to shut down the entire camp.

Climate change stops here - Dam mission completed

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 23, 2009

A few days ago, Swiss Forest Campaigner Asti described her first impressions of the camp. Since arriving she has been busy helping the local community finish a dam that will help preserve the precious peatland and help save the climate...

Ready for the crocodiles

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 22, 2009

From Asti, Forest Campaigner from Switzerland, who has finally arrived at the camp: There is a big buzz in the Climate Defenders Camp this afternoon. With at least 400 local visitors, including loads of children, and plenty of...

The community takes the lead as activists return to the camp

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 22, 2009

From Ashish, a Campaigner from India, who has finally arrived at the camp: We got into the Climate Defenders Camp late Friday night, the yellow Greenpeace banner emerging out of the night as our boat crossed the river from Teluk...

Rainforest a vital and sustainable 'supermarket' for local communities

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 22, 2009

After what she describes as two very emotional and intense weeks at the Climate Defenders Camp in Sumatra, Corinna Hölzel, Forest Campaigner from Germany has now left Indonesia. Corinna had intended to stay in the camp much longer but...

Greenpeace calls on Indonesian government to arrest forest destroyers instead of...

Feature story | November 20, 2009 at 7:00

Greenpeace today marched to the Indonesian Embassy to call on its government to carry the full extent of environmental law on companies that are destroying the carbon-rich peatlands of Indonesia’s Kampar Peninsula in Sumatra. The group, rallying...

Greenpeace today marched to the Indonesian

Image | November 20, 2009 at 7:00

Greenpeace today marched to the Indonesian Embassy to call on its government to fully shut down operations of paper giant Asia Pacific Resources International Holding Limited (APRIL) and other companies destroying the carbon-rich peatlands of...

Crackdown on deforestation - not on Climate Defenders

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 19, 2009

Greenpeace activists in the Philippines calls on Indonesian government to arrest forest destroyers instead of harassing climate defenders The struggle for zero-deforestation has spilled beyond Indonesia as Indonesian authorities...

Every cloud has a silver lining

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 19, 2009 1 comment

When both you and the journalists who are accompanying you start getting arrested and deported it's usually a sign that you're doing something right. At least that's the case if you work for an organisation that takes direct action...

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