Solutions

Indonesia’s plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its  Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

Activists to stay until pulp & paper company APRIL commits to halt deforestation

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 13, 2009

Bustar Maitar, forest campaigner for Greenpeace, has told APRIL that the activists will not leave the concession until the company publicly commits to halting all deforestation and peat land destruction in the Kampar Peninsula. Heavy...

Activists halt all 7 excavators in an Indonesian forest concession

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 13, 2009 1 comment

Greenpeace activists have just locked down three more excavators bringing to a halt all seven of APRIL's excavators in one of the pulp and paper's concessions in the Kampar Peninsula. Earlier this week Greenpeace released fresh...

Greenpeace takes direct action in Indonesia

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 12, 2009

Today Greenpeace activists locked down four excavators in the carbon-rich Kampar Peninsula belonging to pulp and paper company APRIL to highlight the need to immediately halt all deforestation in Indonesia. Carbon emission from...

Greenpeace activists locked themselves to

Image | November 12, 2009 at 7:00

Greenpeace activists locked themselves to seven excavators, owned by Asia Pacific Resources International Holding Limited (APRILRGE), one of Indonesia's biggest pulp and paper producers, to prevent it destroying the rainforest to make way for...

notes from climate ground zero

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 10, 2009 1 comment

Rodora Angeles, Greenpeace Southeast Asia (Philippines) Actions Coordinator ©Greenpeace / Ardiles Rante Writing you all a quick message from Indonesia. Internet is limited and oftentimes connection is difficult. We are after all,...

Naked emperors: the Greenpeace Guide to Climate Politics

Feature story | November 7, 2009 at 10:31

You know the story. The clever tailors that convince a kingdom that only intelligent people can see the clothes they make. Everyone talks about how fine the emperor's outfit is, until one audacious voice pipes up to say there's nothing there, the...

Mission Possible: Restoring the Peatland

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 6, 2009

I am now on the peatland area of Semenanjung Kampar, half an hour away by boat from Greenpeace Climate Defender Camp. As far as I can see are bushes, grasses, several trees, and bushes again. Man, this is not the rainforest. Here I am...

Inglourious treehuggers dam climate change!

Feature story | November 4, 2009 at 14:00

If we told you that there was one single way to cut a fifth of global greenhouse emissions - that simply involved hugging trees - would you believe us? Probably not - but that's exactly what's required. And we've got 50 activists in the...

Mélanie Laurent enjoys the spirit and friendship of Climate Defenders Camp

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 3, 2009 1 comment

Mélanie Laurent witnesses forest destruction - where climate change starts - in Indonesia. From Hikmat, media officer at the Climate Defenders Camp in Indonesia No flashlights. No red carpets. Don’t talk about fancy five-star...

Dam - it's even harder than it looks!

Blog entry by Chuck Baclagon | November 2, 2009

Activist Petteri has been hard at work, blocking the drainage of carbon-rich peatland in Indonesia ( read his first update - and why they are building a dam here ). Update 2 This morning we left camp with two pong pongs - local...

71 - 80 of 257 results.

Categories