Greenpeace activists, elephants and mahouts walk through a woody path leading to the Khao Hua Na Temple near Khao Yai National Park in Nakhon Nayok province, 110 kilometers from Bangkok, during the fourth leg of the Chang(e) Caravan. The symbol of Nak...

Photo | September 16, 2009

Greenpeace activists, elephants and mahouts walk through a woody path leading to the Khao Hua Na Temple near Khao Yai National Park in Nakhon Nayok province, 110 kilometers from Bangkok, during the fourth leg of the Chang(e) Caravan. The symbol of Nakhon Nayok province is an elephant holding rice stalks over his head, a reminder of the days when there were many wild elephants in the rice producing province before deforestation led to dwindling elephant populations. The forests of Khao Yai, one of the last few remaining forests in Thailand, occupy part of the province. Forests maintain ecological systems and play a vital role in stabilizing the world’s climate. The Greenpeace-led Chang(e) Caravan is calling on world leaders ahead of the UN General Assembly in New York on September 22 to take decisive action to stop deforestation as the first and foremost mitigation action to stop climate change.

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