Greenpeace launches first comprehensive global energy strategy for tackling climate change Calls on Senate to fast track RE Bill

Press release - January 25, 2007
Renewable energy, combined with efficiencies from the smart use of energy, can deliver half of the world’s energy needs by 2050, according to one of the most comprehensive plans for future sustainable energy provision, launched today. The report: ‘Energy [R]evolution: A sustainable World Energy Outlook’, produced by the European Renewable Energy Council (EREC) and Greenpeace, provides a practical blueprint for how to cut global CO2 emissions by almost 50% within the next 43 years, while providing a secure and affordable energy supply and, critically, maintaining steady worldwide economic development.

Notably, the plan takes into account rapid economic growth areas such as Southeast Asia, China, India and Africa, and highlights the economic advantages of the energy revolution scenario. It concludes that renewable energies will represent the backbone of the world's economy-not only in developed countries, but also in developing countries such as Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Malaysia, China, India and Brazil. The plan states that renewable energies have the potential to deliver nearly 70% of global electricity supply and 65% of global heat supply by 2050.

"The report demonstrates that a massive uptake of renewable energy is not only urgently necessary but is also technically possible. It correctly points out that all that is missing is the right policy support. The Philippines' Renewable Energy Bill would be the first of such policies in our region, if it is immediately enacted. Our country's renewable energy potential is vast. The report shows we can, and must, harness these solutions now," said Greenpeace Climate & Energy campaigner Jasper Inventor.

The report also highlights the urgency of making the right decisions in energy infrastructure, which will have to be made by governments, investment institutions and utility companies. Within the next decade, many of the existing power plants in the developed countries will come to the end of their technical lifetime and will need to be replaced, while developing countries such as Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Malaysia, China, India, and Brazil are rapidly building up new energy infrastructure to service their growing economies.

Arthouros Zervos, president of the European Renewable Energy Industry Council (EREC) said: "The global market for renewable energy can grow at a double digit rate till 2050, and achieve the size of today's fossil fuel industry. With wind and solar markets worth US$ 38 billion and doubling in size every three years, their growth follows the path of the internet or mobile technology. We therefore call on decision makers around the world to make this vision a reality. The political choices of the coming years will determine the world's environmental and economic situation for many decades to come. Renewable energy can and will have to play a leading role in the world's energy future. There is no technical, but a political, barrier to make this shift."

The report was developed in conjunction with specialists from the Institute of Technical Thermodynamics at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) and more than 30 scientists and engineers from universities, institutes and the renewable energy industry around the world. It provides the first comprehensive global energy concept which gives a detailed analysis of how to restructure the global energy system based only on a detailed regional assessment for the potential of proven renewable energy sources, energy efficiency and the utilization of efficient, decentralized cogeneration. The Energy [R]evolution scenario is compared in the report to the effects on CO2 emissions (and, thereby climate change) of carrying on with a 'business as usual' scenario, that scenario being provided by the International Energy Association's breakdown of 10 world regions, as used in the ongoing series of World

Energy Outlook reports.

Other contacts: Lea Guerrero, Media Campaigner, +63 916 374 4969 In Europe: Oliver Schäfer, Policy Director of EREC, +32 496 65 2837 Sven Teske, Greenpeace International renewable energy campaign, + 31 62129 68 94 Isabel Leal, Greenpeace International media officer, +31 20 718 2229

VVPR info: A copy of Energy [R]evolution: A sustainable world energy outlook can be downloaded at: www.greenpeace.org and www.erec.org

Notes: Highlights of the Report: The Energy [R]evolution Scenario describes a development pathway which transforms the present situation into a sustainable energy supply, within a single generation. Exploitation of the large energy efficiency potential will reduce primary energy demand from the current 435,000 PJ/a (Peta Joules per year) to 422,000 PJ/a by 2050. Under the ‘business as usual’ scenario there would be an increase to 810,000 PJ/a, and a quadrupling of electricity costs. This dramatic reduction is a crucial prerequisite for developing a significant share of renewable energy sources, compensating for the phasing out of nuclear energy and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels. 1. The report was commissioned by Greenpeace and EREC from the Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment (Institute of Technical Thermodynamics) at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). ** 2. The report develops a global sustainable energy pathway up to 2050. The future potential for renewable energy sources has been assessed with input from all sectors of the renewable energy industry around the world, and forms the basis of the Energy [R]evolution Scenario. 3. The energy supply scenarios adopted in this report, which both extend beyond and enhance projections by the International Energy Agency, have been calculated using the MESAP/PlaNet simulation model. This has then been further developed by the Ecofys consultancy to take into account the future potential for energy efficiency measures. 4. The Energy [R]evolution Scenario describes a development pathwaywhich transforms the present situation into a sustainable energy supply through the following mechanisms: • *Exploitation of the large energy efficiency potential will reduce primary energy demand from the current 435,000 PJ/a (Peta Joules per year) to 422,000 PJ/a by 2050. Under the reference scenario there would be an increase to 810,000 PJ/a. This dramatic reduction is a crucial prerequisite for achieving a significant share of renewable energy sources, compensating for the phasing out of nuclear energy and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels. • *The increased use of combined heat and power generation (CHP) also improves the supply system’s energy conversion efficiency, increasingly using natural gas and biomass. In the long term, decreasing demand for heat and the large potential for producing heat directly from renewable energy sources limits the further expansion of CHP. • *The electricity sector will be the pioneer of renewable energy utilization. By 2050, around 70% of electricity will be produced from renewable energy sources, including large hydro. An installed capacity of 7,100 GW will produce 21,400 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/a) of electricity in 2050. • *In the heat supply sector, the contribution of renewables will increase to 65% by 2050. Fossil fuels will be increasingly replaced by more efficient modern technologies, in particular biomass, solar collectors and geothermal. • *Before biofuels can play a substantial role in the transport sector, the existing large efficiency potentials have to be exploited. In this study, biomass is primarily committed to stationary applications; the use of biofuels for transport is limited by the availability of sustainably grown biomass. • *By 2050, half of primary energy demand will be covered by renewable energy sources.