Rice Art: Art on Organic Rice Field

หน้า - พฤศจิกายน 3, 2552
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"Thai Love Thai Rice"... Greenpeace encourages all Thais to recognize the importance of Thai rice - our staple crop and our rice farmers - the backbones of the nation, who are being affected by climate change and genetically modified rice.

Since the start of this year, Greenpeace has been trying to protect rice cultivation, a Thai heritage and reminding us all to protect our most important food crop from the threats of genetic engineering and climate change.

A Thai farmer is threshing organic rice seedlings to remove soil before transplant to a specially-designated Greenpeace rice field. The rice field will grow into an artwork or "rice art" depicting farmers harvesting the world's most important food crop.

The rice art, which celebrates Thailand's rich rice heritage, is meant to remind governments to protect the region's most important food crop from the imminent threat of genetic engineering, as well as from the grave impacts of climate change.

Greenpeace cherishes our rice cultivation heritage by using a giant organic artwork. On 14 February of this year, Greenpeace invited you to join our 'Grow your Love for Thai Rice' event. We planted our work of art on Thailand's Central Plains - an area recognised as one of Southeast Asia's most fertile rice producing regions -- with 2 organic rice species with 2 different colors.  One is an irrigated local rice variety which appears green from above, the second is a traditional black rice variety.

The 'Rice Art' occupies an area of 10 rais (16,000 square metres) and depicts farmers wearing straw hats and using sickles to harvest rice - reflecting the traditions and way of life of the rice farmers.

Here is the Rice Art, of which some of you may have gone to see how impressive it had turned out to be.

At the moment the Rice Art field has turned yellow. Here it is....

Click here to see children planting rice in "Grow your Love for Thai Rice" event on Valentine's Day.

Rice is the most important food crop in Southeast Asia, accounting for around 25 percent of the world's total rice production in 2008. Climate change will profoundly affect agriculture worldwide. Moreover, rice production in countries such as Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand is facing threats from profit-driven bio-tech corporations.

Greenpeace is campaigning for GE-free crops and food production. This is grounded on the principles of sustainability, protection of biodiversity, and providing all people access to safe and nutritious food.

Greenpeace would like to invite all Thais & the government to safeguard our rice against the risky 'technologies' like genetic engineering and invest in productive and ecological methods of farming that are not dependent on harmful chemical inputs.

Organic rice seedling which will be used to create a Greenpeace rice field art. The first variety, Chai-nat 1, is an irrigated local rice variety and the second is Khum Phayao, a traditional black rice variety.

Organic rice seedling which were used to create a Greenpeace rice field art. The rice art, planted on a 10 rai (16,000 square meters) area in Thailand's Central Plains, one of Southeast Asia's most fertile rice producing regions, will reflect the traditions and way of life of rice farming by depicting farmers wearing straw hats and using sickles to harvest rice.

Thai farmers transplant organic rice seedlings to a specially-designated Greenpeace rice field. The rice field will grow into an artwork or "rice art" depicting farmers harvesting the world's most important food crop.

Portrait of Mrs. Samnieng Huadlim, aged 62, farmer and owner of organic rice field where a Greenpeace "rice art is being planted. Mrs. Samnieng has been an organic farmer since 2004. Mrs. Samnieng found that her way of organic agriculture uses very low investment (less than 1,000 baht), comparing to about 4,000 baht of agro-chemical agriculture but gives the same amount of yields.

Process of making organic rice noodles in a small noodle factory which is run by Huadlim's family. Per one rai (1,600 square meter), of rice field can produce 1,000 kilograms of rice noodles. Everyday the family can produce at least 200 kilograms of organic rice noodles.

A Thai farmer is preparing organic rice seedlings for transplant to a specially-designated Greenpeace rice field. The rice field will grow into an artwork or "rice art" depicting farmers harvesting the world's most important food crop.

A crab is found in the rice field where a Greenpeace "rice art" is being transplanted. The presence of the crustacean is an indication of fertile biodiversity, a key benefit from sustainable ecological farming.

Farmers planting rice for the rice art. The rice art, which celebrates Thailand's rich rice heritage, is meant to remind governments to protect the region's most important food crop from the imminent threat of genetic engineering, as well as from the grave impacts of climate change.

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