Be an Amazon defender

Every day, forests are destroyed to create the products we use in our daily lives. Global industries are destroying everything we have — eradicating species and threatening environmental defenders in the process — and hoping we'll turn a blind eye. From changing the way you consume to showing solidarity with Indigenous communities, you can be part of the movement to defend the Amazon from corporate destruction.

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Stand with Indigenous forest defenders
Fight for a better food future
Stand with the Munduruku
Stop illegal logging

Violence towards Indigenous peoples in Brazil is growing at an alarming rate, with violent invasions by illegal loggers, miners, and land grabbers. The hunt for natural resources and corporate profit has violently given license to expand in Indigenous lands at any cost. We must all shine a light on these attacks on human rights and our environment.

About three-quarters of all agricultural land on Earth is used for animal production and growing feed, causing mass deforestation and biodiversity loss. In the Amazon, cattle is the biggest driver of deforestation. That's why we are fighting for companies to take responsibility and for a new food system that embraces local farmers, protects our health, and heals the planet.

The Munduruku Indigenous people have been fighting for decades to protect their traditional land in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. In 2015, the Munduruku and their allies succesfully halted a proposed megadam in their home, but the battle is not over. Stand with the Munduruku once again as they fight for demarcation of their territory.

Violence against Indigenous and local communites is rising and often linked to illegal loggers. Greenpeace has been exposing the fraud in the system that allows this timber to be exported all over the world. We've created an interactive platform that anyone can play to identify evidence of real frauds in management plans and send alerts to the Brazilian authorities calling for action.

1 Stand with Indigenous forest defenders

Violence towards Indigenous peoples in Brazil is growing at an alarming rate, with violent invasions by illegal loggers, miners, and land grabbers. The hunt for natural resources and corporate profit has violently given license to expand in Indigenous lands at any cost. We must all shine a light on these attacks on human rights and our environment.

Meet the Karipuna

About three-quarters of all agricultural land on Earth is used for animal production and growing feed, causing mass deforestation and biodiversity loss. In the Amazon, cattle is the biggest driver of deforestation. That's why we are fighting for companies to take responsibility and for a new food system that embraces local farmers, protects our health, and heals the planet.

Eat more plants

The Munduruku Indigenous people have been fighting for decades to protect their traditional land in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. In 2015, the Munduruku and their allies succesfully halted a proposed megadam in their home, but the battle is not over. Stand with the Munduruku once again as they fight for demarcation of their territory.

Sign the petition

Violence against Indigenous and local communites is rising and often linked to illegal loggers. Greenpeace has been exposing the fraud in the system that allows this timber to be exported all over the world. We've created an interactive platform that anyone can play to identify evidence of real frauds in management plans and send alerts to the Brazilian authorities calling for action.

Become an investigator

Stand with the guardians of the Amazon

Indigenous Peoples are heroes of our times, they protect the rainforest for all of us who depend on it for a healthy climate. But often these efforts expose them to threats and violence. We stand in solidarity with these guardians of the Amazon as they confront powerful logging and agribusiness corporations that don't think twice about destroying forests and trampling human rights.

Learn more

Imaginary trees, real destruction

Indiscriminate and illegal logging is damaging the forest and increasing rural violence in Brazil. Our investigations have identified frauds in the system that allows illegal timber to enter the market as if it was legal. This timber then travels all over the world to become furniture, flooring, and other household products.

Read the report

Latest news about forests

A Munduruku in the Tapajós River, in the Amazon rainforest. © Valdemir Cunha / Greenpeace