Our vision


Solutions to deforestation exist.

We're campaigning for zero deforestation globally by 2020.

And how do we plan to do this exactly?

Greenpeace is campaigning for a future that will allow our forests to thrive - filled with unique wildlife and able to sustain local people and economies whilst cleaning the air of carbon: a future with no deforestation.

This may be ambitious, but it is possible. In fact, because stopping forest destruction is one of the easiest and most cost effective ways to prevent catastrophic climate change, we think it's essential.

To protect these precious ecosystems, the international communitycorporationsindigenous communities and individuals will need to work together in an unprecedented, concerted effort. Greenpeace is campaigning to realize this vision in several ways.  

Let's start with YOU. 

Consumer Power

Consumer power - or people power - works. It works because the destruction of ancient forests is driven by global demand for products like paper, timber and palm oil, and only thrives because most consumers rarely hold the producers accountable. But, when we do - en masse - our power is phenomenal.

We believe that consumer power - when combined with political solutionscorporate action and the work of forest communities - can help to achieve our vision of zero deforestation by 2020.  Read more about the impact consumers have had on convincing corporations like Kimberley-ClarkKraft and Burger King  to minimize their contribution to deforestation.

Corporations/Markets

If corporations have the ability to destroy the world's intact forests, they also have the power to help save them. 

Companies can make an impact by introducing zero-deforestation policies that require suppliers to produce commodities such as timber, beef, soy, palm oil and paper fiber in a way that has a minimal impact on natural forests and the climate. Companies can also introduce paper procurement policies that set ambitious targets to maximize use of post consumer recycled wood, pulp, paper and fiber in their products and ensure that any virgin fiber used is certified by a rigorous third party certification system such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

Read more about the Forest Stewardship Council.

Greenpeace investigates, exposes and confronts environmental abuse by corporations around the world, and takes action with its supporters. Our campaigns have shifted the buying behavior of major companies, creating immediate impacts in the market and on the ground. Dig deeper into what our research has uncovered.

Be a forest-friendly consumer! 

  • Buy forest-derived products made from 100% post-consumer content materials 
  • Buy virgin-forest fiber products with a seal from a credible forestry certification system, like the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)
  • Learn about the FSC and false forms of forest certification
  • As a consumer ask questions about how the products you buy impact the forests.
  • Educate your friends, family, and community about how our actions here can impact forests thousands of miles away.

Politics

In order to achieve zero deforestation by 2020 we need ambitious and science-based domestic and international forest policies from our government.

We use U.S. laws like the Wilderness Act, Lacey Act and the Roadless Rule to protect U.S. forests and stop illegal wood products from entering the U.S. marketplace.

We also support and use treaties like the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to help protect forests and the endangered plant and animal species that rely on forests for habitats.

The international community must also urgently commit to mechanisms that reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in tropical forest developing nations. Forests for Climate is a landmark proposal for an international funding mechanism to protect tropical forests. Developing countries with tropical forests that choose to participate in Forests for Climate would make commitments to protecting their forests and in exchange would have the opportunity to receive funding for capacity-building efforts and for national-level reductions in deforestation emissions. This would provide a strong incentive for developing countries to continually improve their forest protection programs. Read more about Forests for Climate. Read more about forest protection deals.

Read more about Forests for Climate.

Read more about forest protection deals.

The latest updates

 

Palm oil giant Wilmar caves to public pressure, commits to end forests destruction

Blog by Kat Clark | December 5, 2013

Wilmar International, the world’s largest palm oil trader today announced a No Deforestation Policy in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s...

This is what ‘dirty’ palm oil looks like

Blog by Bustar Maitar | November 22, 2013

Bumitama Agro, a notorious palm oil supplier to Wilmar with a track record of of forest destruction, has hit headlines in Indonesia. Yesterday it denied that it has “destroyed forest or killed orang-utans”, but promised that it would halt all...

Amazon destruction increases 28% over last year

Blog by Daniela Montalto | November 15, 2013

Yesterday, the Brazilian government released annual figures for deforestation in the Amazon and the news is not good. A total of 5,843 square kilometres are estimated lost between August 2012 and July 2013, an increase in deforestation of 28...

Wilmar, an Orangutan Graveyard and Our Addiction to Dirty Palm Oil

Blog by Amy Moas | November 12, 2013

My colleague Wirendro Sumargo, based in Greenpeace’s office in Indonesia, recently wrote about a moving experience witnessing the plight of the orangutan. His evidence of forest destruction and endangered wildlife deaths at the hands of one palm...

A Halloween tale of Tigers, Candy and Forest Destroying Monsters

Blog by Joao Talocchi | October 31, 2013

It all started during the mid-19th century. Technology advances in shipping allowed the opening of new commercial routes and fur flung areas of the world were connected, as large wooden ships sailed through the oceans, distributing people and...

36 - 40 of 213 results.

Topics