Following Acquittal, Greenpeace Announces National Forest Protests

 

Media release - May 27, 2004
Greenpeace Executive Director, John Passacantando, appeared at the Endangered Forests Press Conference and Rally to join national forest organizations from around the country in announcing a summer of peaceful protests against President Bush's attack on old-growth forests as well as its attempt to silence its critics.

Washington, D.C. - Just one week after the Bush administration's failed attempt to prosecute Greenpeace, the group's Executive Director, John Passacantando, appeared today at the Endangered Forests Press Conference and Rally. The event, which was attended by more than 50 individuals and forest protection advocates, included creative street theatre and a giant slice - more than nine feet tall - of a Douglas fir.

The slice of timber, referred to as " Doug" has been travelling across the nation to educate and inform the public about the impact of the Bush administration's timber policies on U.S. ancient forests. Speakers at the press conference included representatives from the Coalition of Environment and Jewish Life, American Lands Alliance, National Forest Protection Alliance and Shenandoah Ecosystems Defense Group.

"The Bush administration continues to use every means at its disposal to try to squash our right to free speech. And I stand with you today because it is time to put the public back in public lands," said John Passacantando, Greenpeace Executive Director. "Despite the Bush administration's scare tactics, Greenpeace will not be deterred from our vision. We won our unprecedented trial in Miami, and we now head back to the forests to continue the work."

Greenpeace is joining national forest organizations from around the country in a summer of peaceful protests against President Bush's attack on old-growth forests as well as its attempt to silence its critics. On May 17, 2004, Greenpeace became the first organization to be prosecuted for the free speech activities of its supporters. A federal judge dismissed the charges for lack of evidence. The case arose from a peaceful protest in Miami exposing a shipment of illegal mahogany from the Brazilian Amazon.

Under the theme of "Defending Forest, Defending Freedoms," Greenpeace will intensify its work on endangered forests in the United States, which the Bush administration is attempting to put on the chopping block. The international environmental organization will work with individuals and grassroots organizations in states including Alaska, South Dakota, Oregon and Virginia to expose the White House's pro-timber industry forest agenda.

"This is a vision that Greenpeace shares with Americans and people around the world, a vision of an end to all commercial logging on endangered forests," continued Passacantando. "A vision of greater protection for those precious few five percent of ancient forests left in the United States."

CONTACT: Nancy Hwa 202-2432; 202-413-8521Carol Gregory 202-319-2472; 202-413-8531 (cell)