Greenpeace Calls for a Clean Hydrogen Initiative

 

Media release - February 5, 2003
Greenpeace is encouraged that President Bush has brought hydrogen and fuel cells into the national spotlight as a solution to our nation's energy problems. However, his FreedomFuel initiative in its current form is a dirty energy trap for Americans. Unless hydrogen is produced using clean energy sources -- not coal and nuclear power as the Bush plan proposes --our country's security will be further undermined with increased nuclear waste and accelerated global warming.

If the President wants to show leadership on creating a clean energy future, he has to provide more than hydrogen gift wrapping around dirty energy technologies that are at the center of the Bush-Cheney Energy Plan.

No Dirty Hydrogen from Coal and Nukes

The Bush Administration's so-called FreedomFuel initiative is a dirty hydrogen plan, focusing on generating hydrogen from coal and nuclear power sources. Coal and nuclear power will never offer sustainable solutions to our energy needs. These technologies are polluting, dangerous and extremely susceptible to sabotage. Hydrogen fuel should be produced with the plentiful, clean renewable energy resources of the United States, such as wind and solar power. For example, Los Angeles is already home to a solar powered hydrogen generating station, allowing hydrogen vehicles to put the sun in their tank. A hydrogen vision based on renewable energy will end our expensive addiction to fossil fuels, stop global warming and halt the production of nuclear waste for energy.

Clean Energy Now, Not in 2020

A rapid transition to a clean hydrogen economy would free the US from oil interests while providing increased environmental security. President Bush's commitment to hydrogen needs to reflect the urgent need to reduce American's dependence on oil, we need clean energy solutions today, not decades from now. Commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles can begin far before the 2020 date identified in the President's program. Toyota and Honda have already delivered prototype vehicles to California. Experts in the field emphasize that what is needed now is a strong market to rapidly bring production to scale and the vehicles into the hands of consumers in the next few years, rather than decades from now.