Jason Box adjusts a remote time-lapse cameras high on the cliffs on the south east side of Petermann Glacier, one of Greenland's largest and most northerly glaciers. These provide a unique and revealing insight into how glacial ice breaks and drifts t...

Image | July 21, 2009

Jason Box adjusts a remote time-lapse cameras high on the cliffs on the south east side of Petermann Glacier, one of Greenland's largest and most northerly glaciers. These provide a unique and revealing insight into how glacial ice breaks and drifts to sea. The installation of several time lapse cameras on Petermann and other glaciers in north Greenland is a joint initiative between Greenpeace and Extreme Ice Survey (EIS). It is hoped that they will give a clear picture of the process by which the glacier breaks and how parts of it drift out to sea. A team of scientists assisted by experts in ice logistics, intend to document its ongoing disintegration. Satellite images show that an expanse larger than New York's Manhattan island is ready to break off from Petermann Glacier.