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Saving the Arctic: The Expedition

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Visit Into the Arctic to explore the beauty of the Arctic, the threats it faces and our struggle to protect it.

We've raised global awareness about the dangers of Arctic oil drilling, climbed oil rigs to obstruct operations, mobilized nearly three million people and celebrated as major oil companies backed off plans to drill in the Arctic.  View a timeline of our campaign. We won't stop until the Arctic is declared a global sancuary.

In 2012, six Greenpeace International activists, including Greenpeace International Executive Director Kumi Naidoo, climbed a rig belonging to Gazprom, a Russian oil company. 

"We can't match Shell's enormous financial muscle, but we have creativity and millions of people behind us. This is the defining environmental battle of our time and we have only just begun."
-Kumi Naidoo, Greenpeace International Executive Director

Saving the Arctic: Stopping Global Warming

Many of us may never get the chance to travel to the top of the world. Yet similar to the places often unseen, the Arctic needs our help. During our most recent Arctic excursion, a crewmember called the Arctic a "big air conditioner."That's because the sea ice in the Arctic regulates our global climate by reflecting sunlight. That ice is melting at a rapid rate meaning the ocean absorbs the sunlight resulting in a warmer earth. This of course causes more sea ice to melt. Sounds like a vicious cycle, huh?

Not only does the Arctic work to regulate the global climate, it's also home to a rich ecosystem and indigenous people who depend on that ecosystem. Polar bears, seals, walruses and whales are just some of the species that call the Arctic home. And it's all in danger.

What is the Threat?

Oil companies are eager to profit from the melting sea ice by drilling in the Arctic. While the entire oil industry is looking to move into the Arctic, Shell is leading the way. Yet they have proven several times that there are in no way Arctic ready with various mishaps including a rig on the loose and a fire aboard their drill ship The Noble Discoverer.  

Despite their very public and very embarassing mistakes, Shell is determined to profit from the Arctic, groundzero of global warming. They're planning to drill in the same spot where Greenpeace and University of Alaska scientist Kelley Newman discovered coral, recorded orca whale calls and talked to the amazing people of Point Hope, Alaska. 

Nevermind that Shell's plans to drill for oil contribute to the vicious cycle of global warming.  The climate in the Arctic can be severe and unpredictable making an oil spill likely-and catastrophic. You would think the Arctic Council, an intergovernmental body of Arctic governments and citizens, would have a solid spill-response plan to prepare for this likely occurence. We were pretty shocked to read in a leaked draft that the Council had no real plan established in the likely case of a spill.

In addition to the new threat from Shell, the Russian oil industry spills 30 million barrels of oil each year. That's seven times the amount that escaped during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Every 18 months, more than 4 billion barrels spews into the Arctic.

Media Contacts:

Travis Nichols (Atlanta)

Media Contacts:

Cassady Sharp (Washington, DC)

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace USA 2013 Photo of the Year

Blog by Robert Meyers | December 23, 2013

    As I looked over the amazing global Greenpeace photography in 2013, I come back to this image by Denis Sinyakov as the Greenpeace USA Photo of the Year for 2013.       This image captures the dramatic moment that the gloves came off in the...

The polar bear: More than a poster child

Blog by Cassady Sharp | December 11, 2013

  It’s no mystery that polar bears are in trouble. Scientists and experts at a recent international meeting claim that two-thirds of the world’s polar bears will be gone by 2050. The furry predators have long been viewed as the charismatic mammal...

With help from Shell, Gazprom could start drilling in the Arctic any day now

Blog by Nicky Davies | December 10, 2013

Any day now, with the help of Shell, a company called Gazprom will extract the first drops of oil from below the Russian Arctic. Shell is hoping to follow in the footsteps of its Russian partner by doing the same thing off the coast of Alaska...

WATCH this hilarious interruption of a press conference in Denmark

Blog by Cassady Sharp | December 9, 2013

Greenpeace took action to highlight the risks of Arctic oil drilling by Gazprom at a press conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, before the Champions League match between FC Copenhagen and Real Madrid. The Russian oil giant has recently signed a...

WATCH: Arctic 30 reacts to bail releases

Blog by Cassady Sharp | November 22, 2013

Watch this moving compilation featuring the emotional moments experienced by those members of the Arctic 30 who have this week been granted bail and released from prison in Saint Petersburg.

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