Close

U.S. Government Imposes Forced Labor Penalty on Vessel Linked to Bumble Bee’s Corporate Owner

August 18, 2020

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, announced a Withhold Release Order (WRO) on all seafood harvested by the fishing vessel Da Wang due to reasonable suspicion of forced labor on the vessel.

Tuna is seen caught in the net of the purse seine fishing vessel.

Tuna is seen caught in the net of the purse seine fishing vessel.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Trade, announced today a Withhold Release Order (WRO) on all seafood harvested by the Taiwanese-owned, Vanuatu-flagged fishing vessel Da Wang due to reasonable suspicion of forced labor on the vessel. The WRO on Da Wang was triggered in part by the Greenpeace Southeast Asia (GPSEA) report, Seabound: The Journey to Modern Slavery on the High Seas, and follows previous WROs on Tunago No. 61 and Yu Long No. 2.

All three vessels – the only ones in the global fishing industry penalized under the US Tariff Act so far – are Taiwanese-owned or flagged, and two of the three have known direct or indirect links to FCF Co., Ltd. (FCF), one of the largest seafood traders in the world and the parent company of US-based Bumble Bee Foods. These WROs demonstrate that forced labor in the Taiwanese distant water fishing (DWF) fleet is systemic and remains a significant problem that must be urgently addressed by all stakeholders, especially governments[1], and the companies that source from the Taiwanese fleet.

In response, Andy Shen, Senior Oceans Adviser at Greenpeace U.S.A., said:

“Today’s Withhold Release Order makes it clear to U.S. buyers of Bumble Bee or FCF supplied tuna that there are legal, financial, and reputational risks to sourcing from companies that fail to uphold their human rights responsibilities to fishers. Bold, transformative changes are needed now to prevent future penalties that further disrupt the supply of tuna to U.S. retailers and result in significant financial loss to all companies connected to the Taiwanese distant water fishing industry.

“The days of turning a blind eye are over. U.S. companies must address forced labor risks in their seafood supply chain by adopting and implementing Greenpeace’s recommended measures to prevent forced labor in the tuna industry[2], including conducting human rights due diligence down to the vessel level. Companies must also publicly disclose the identities and key details of all their suppliers, including any human rights violations and remedies provided to victims.”

###

Add Your Name: Tell Bumble Bee to Protect Human Rights and Our Oceans

Notes 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection announcement 

[1] Greenpeace Briefing on Taiwan for the US Department of Labor 2020 List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor 

[2] Greenpeace Sustainability, Labour & Human Rights, and Chain of Custody Asks for Retailers, Brand Owners and Seafood Companies

Media Contact
Tyler Kruse
Senior Communications Specialist, Greenpeace U.S.A.
[email protected]
(808) 741-2791

We Need Your Voice. Join Us!

Want to learn more about tax-deductible giving, donating stock and estate planning?

Visit Greenpeace Fund, a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) charitable entity created to increase public awareness and understanding of environmental issues through research, the media and educational programs.