Defending Our Oceans

All around the world, our oceans are in crisis.

Our appetite for fish is threatening to overwhelm the ocean’s ecology, while the slaughter of whales and industrial fishing methods are destroying endangered species.

The oceans are the source of all life on earth, and every day, they continue to nurture us. They provide half the oxygen we breathe. They regulate our climate and our rainfall. They give us a bounty of seafood; they revitalize us with their beauty and their splendor.

In return, many people treat the ocean as both landfill and bottomless provider. Its creatures are harvested to the point of extinction, and pollution, trash and oil spills are thoughtlessly dumped back.

Over 80% of the earth’s creatures live in the oceans, and we too depend on the oceans for a healthy planet. We need to protect our oceans because without them life on Earth would not – and cannot – exist.

Greenpeace is striving to end illegal and pirate fishing, reduce fishing efforts, and establish marine reserves throughout the Pacific.

The latest updates

 

The Sugayatri

Image | 2006-01-16 at 10:00

The Sugayatri, Greenpeace India's boat, defending Olive Ridley turtles.

Face-saving declaration by the WTO fails to address the real impacts of free trade

Press release | 2005-12-18 at 10:00

In an outright rejection of the Ministerial Declaration issued at the culmination of the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Sixth Ministerial, Greenpeace has termed the meeting a failure for environment and development. While the declaration allows...

Greenpeace calls for a new start at WTO negotiations in Hong Kong

Press release | 2005-12-13 at 10:22

As delegates from around the world gather for the WTO Ministerial starting today, Greenpeace warned that free trade must not be prioritised over the interests of people and the environment. Greenpeace argues that the Hong Kong Ministerial can be...

Chinese fishermen off

Image | 2004-08-04 at 9:00

Chinese fishermen off-load yellow fin tuna at a tuna packing plant. This majestic fish will likely be exported to end up as American canned tuna or Japanese sushi.

Workers on a Taiwanese purse seiner trans

Image | 2004-08-03 at 9:00

Workers on a Taiwanese purse seiner trans-ship yellow fin tuna and skipjack tuna to a reefer (refrigerator) ship. As fisheries collapse in other parts of the world, countries are moving their fishing fleets into the Pacific.

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