Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

5 Ways Seismic Blasting Threatens Whales

Blog entry by Farrah Khan, Arctic Campaigner | August 27, 2015

We don’t have to look very far back in history to find proof of why offshore oil drilling is a dangerous endeavour. The BP oil blowout and  the Exxon-Valdez spill both left surrounding regions devastated and neither company was able to...

Stop Shell from being allowed to spill oil off the coast of Nova Scotia for up to...

Blog entry by Mark Brooks | August 13, 2015

Proving once again that the Harper government is more than happy to do the bidding of oil companies in Canada, federal Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq recently agreed to allow Shell up to 21 days to cap a blow out from an oil well ...

Stop Shell Canada and Harper from dumping a known toxic chemical in our oceans!

Blog entry by Mark Brooks, Arctic Campaigner | July 30, 2015 1 comment

ACT: Oil spills in the ocean are toxic enough, adding COREXIT makes it  52 times more toxic .  Click here to email Environment Canada today  and ask them to ban COREXIT.  In yet another case of the Harper government ignoring...

Close your eyes and imagine an Arctic sanctuary

Blog entry by Marine Temperman | July 16, 2015

This is a story about the frozen ocean at the top of our planet. It's wild and untouched, and at the moment it's owned by everyone and no-one. This is the Arctic high seas, the wild west of the high north, and our global commons. But...

Sense & Sustainability: Oscar winner Emma Thompson stands with Clyde River

Blog entry by Stephanie Hulse | June 23, 2015

The people of Clyde River, on Baffin Island, have courageously taken matters into their own hands to protect the Arctic from offshore oil and gas exploration. In fact, they brought the issue to the Federal Court of Appeal and...

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