Forests

With 80 per cent of the planet's ancient forests already lost or degraded, the need for increased protection of the world's remaining forests is more urgent than ever. Forests help stabilize the climate, sustain life, provide jobs, and are the source of culture for many Indigenous communities. Greenpeace opposes destructive and unsustainable development in the remaining ancient forests in Canada and globally. To effect positive change and put lasting solutions in place, we challenge the global marketplace, engage consumers, pressure governments and work with industry to protect the Boreal Forest, the Great Bear Rainforest and the Indonesian rainforest.

Boreal Forest

Stretching from coast to coast, the Boreal forest is one of the largest tracts of ancient forest in the world, encompassing more than half of Canada's landmass. It is a diverse and awe-inspiring landscape of granite outcrops, lakes, rivers and marshes, interspersed with pine, spruce, aspen and poplar forests. It is home to hundreds of First Nations and other communities, as well as threatened iconic species such as woodland caribou and wolverine. 

The Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear Rainforest represents one quarter of the world's remaining coastal temperate rainforests. It stretches along the mainland coast of British Columbia from the Discovery Islands to the Alaska border - an area the size of Switzerland. The region is home to the rare white Spirit Bear, five species of salmon, the unique coastal wolf and magnificent cedars. It is also the unceded traditional territories of over two dozen First Nations. Once threatened with industrial logging, over the past twenty years Greenpeace, its environmental partners, and the forestry industry have worked hard with First Nations governments and the BC Government to safeguard the region to help ensure it is managed responsibly for future generations. Now 85% of the forested landbase of the Great Bear Rainforest is off limits to industrial logging.

Indonesian rainforests

Greenpeace campaigns to prevent the reckless destruction of Indonesia's remaining rainforests. We are doing so to protect endangered wildlife like the Sumatran tiger and orangutan, to support forest communities, and to stop greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation. One of the leading drivers of this forest destruction is Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL).

Clayoquot Sound

British Columbia’s Clayoquot Sound is an ecological treasure of regional, national and global significance. Its mountains, valleys and islands represent Vancouver Island’s largest intact ancient rainforest. Home to 45 known endangered, threatened and vulnerable animal species, Clayoquot’s forests are an invaluable haven for wildlife. In the early 1990s, Greenpeace joined fellow environmental groups, the region’s First Nations and the public to protect the intact old-growth rainforests of Clayoquot Sound from logging. However, despite increased protection, many of these ecologically intact areas remain unprotected and are still vulnerable to logging today.

The latest updates

 

Only half of Great Bear Rainforest off-limits to logging:

Feature story | February 7, 2012 at 10:08

Despite widespread public and political support for an agreement to save one of the world’s last and largest intact coastal temperate rainforests, only half of British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest is currently protected from logging.

Greenpeace ad labels Asia Pulp & Paper a tiger killer

Feature story | January 23, 2012 at 9:00

Greenpeace launched an advertising campaign today illustrating the consequences of Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) rainforest destruction on the critically endangered Sumatran tiger in Indonesia. The tiger themed advertisement, appearing in locations...

APP pulps trees from its own tiger sanctuary. How dumb is that?

Blog entry by Ian Duff, Greenpeace UK | December 20, 2011

This was APP's Senepis Tiger Sanctuary, until one of APP's suppliers cut down the trees. Image: Eyes on the Forest/WW Indonesia Asia Pulp and Paper – the company doing so much to jeopardise the future of Indonesia's rainforests –...

Asia Pulp and Paper exposed for pulping tiger sanctuaries

Blog entry by Richard Brooks | December 15, 2011

A new report has just been released by the Eyes on The Forest organization in Indonesia. Through field investigations in June and October 2011 and historical satellite image analysis up to June 2011, Eyes on the Forest found that...

First Nations reaffirm commitment to stop tar sands pipeline and tankers on...

Blog entry by Melina Laboucan-Massimo | December 1, 2011

December 1 st marks the one-year anniversary of the signing of the Save the Fraser Declaration . Today in Vancouver the Yinka Dene Alliance is holding a press conference to commemorate the precedent-setting declaration, which took...

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