Forests

With 80 per cent of the planet's ancient forests already lost or degraded, the need for increased protection of the world's remaining forests is more urgent than ever. Forests help stabilize the climate, sustain life, provide jobs, and are the source of culture for many Indigenous communities. Greenpeace opposes destructive and unsustainable development in the remaining ancient forests in Canada and globally. To effect positive change and put lasting solutions in place, we challenge the global marketplace, engage consumers, pressure governments and work with industry to protect the Boreal Forest, the Great Bear Rainforest and the Indonesian rainforest.

Boreal Forest

Stretching from coast to coast, the Boreal forest is one of the largest tracts of ancient forest in the world, encompassing more than half of Canada's landmass. It is a diverse and awe-inspiring landscape of granite outcrops, lakes, rivers and marshes, interspersed with pine, spruce, aspen and poplar forests. It is home to hundreds of First Nations and other communities, as well as threatened iconic species such as woodland caribou and wolverine. 

Great Bear Rainforest

The Great Bear rainforest represents one quarter of the world's remaining coastal temperate rainforest. It stretches along the mainland coast of British Columbia to the Alaska border and covers an area the size of Switzerland. The Great Bear rainforest is home to the rare white Spirit Bear, salmon streams and dozens of First Nations communities. Once wholly threatened with large-scale industrial logging, Greenpeace continues to work to ensure that the 2006 and 2009 Great Bear Rainforest Agreements are implemented for the rainforest's long-term protection.

Indonesian rainforests

Greenpeace campaigns to prevent the reckless destruction of Indonesia's remaining rainforests. We are doing so to protect endangered wildlife like the Sumatran tiger and orangutan, to support forest communities, and to stop greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation. One of the leading drivers of this forest destruction is Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL).

Clayoquot Sound

British Columbia’s Clayoquot Sound is an ecological treasure of regional, national and global significance. Its mountains, valleys and islands represent Vancouver Island’s largest intact ancient rainforest. Home to 45 known endangered, threatened and vulnerable animal species, Clayoquot’s forests are an invaluable haven for wildlife. In the early 1990s, Greenpeace joined fellow environmental groups, the region’s First Nations and the public to protect the intact old-growth rainforests of Clayoquot Sound from logging. However, despite increased protection, many of these ecologically intact areas remain unprotected and are still vulnerable to logging today.

The latest updates

 

Sinar Mas caught with pants on fire, fibbing to stock markets

Blog entry by Stephanie Goodwin | August 19, 2010

Shooting yourself in the foot. Getting egg all over your face. These and many more idioms apply to the Sinar Mas group which, following the release of its audit last week, has seen its executives "misreporting" the audit's findings...

Ecologist publishes Greenpeace commentary on the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Blog entry by Richard Brooks | August 18, 2010

Greenpeace reveals its long-term strategy and dedication to protect the Boreal Forest Greenpeace is one of the largest environmental organizations in the world and our campaigns and tactics are big, bold and hard to miss.  Though...

The Pipeline that would Poison Paradise

Blog entry by Stephanie Goodwin | July 28, 2010 3 comments

by Stephanie Goodwin, Greenpeace B.C. Director Greenpeace activist Brian Beaudry and I have been locked down in our large protest camp outside Enbridge Pipelines' downtown Vancouver office for the past eight hours. We are...

B.C. can choose to avoid massive oil spill

Blog entry by Stephanie Goodwin | July 7, 2010 1 comment

First published in the Georgia Straight , July 5, 2010. Imagine kayaking through peanut butter. Except the peanut butter is toxic crude oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Paddling through the marshes of the...

BP Oil Spill: It’s the animals that worry me.

Blog entry by Stephanie Goodwin | July 5, 2010 2 comments

We have now been down here on the Gulf of Mexico for 5 days. It is hot and humid. Even though I knew full-well we were heading straight into hurricane Alex, I blithely expected clear skies and long sunny days. I am one member of...

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