Oceans

Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.

Tuna

Tuna

Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.

Supermarkets

Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.

 

The latest updates

 

Update from Senegal: victory for our oceans!

Blog entry by Raoul Monsembula, Greenpeace Africa | May 14, 2012

Last week, the Senegalese government cancelled all fishing permits for foreign“ pelagic trawlers ,” large fishing vessels that drag nets below the surface of the ocean. This should remind leaders that with political will and...

Shocking images from the BP Gulf disaster

Blog entry by kdavies | May 9, 2012

The White House and BP have been hiding the truth about the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf. After almost two years after Greenpeace submitted a Freedom of Information Request for images and information related to the BP...

Greenpeace volunteers talk to Torontonians about Clover Leaf's unsustainable practices

Blog entry by Alex Speers-Roesch | April 24, 2012

Greenpeace volunteers were hitting the streets of Toronto this past week, going door to door in Leslieville and the Annex talking to people about Greenpeace's most recent ranking of Canada’s major canned tuna brands and raising...

“Tuna the Wonderfish” not so wonderful after all

Blog entry by Sarah King | April 17, 2012

Multi-million dollar US advertising campaign to promote unsustainable canned tuna collapses In March, just a year after the launch of a planned three-year, multi-million dollar advertising push to try and increase sales of...

Pacific Tuna Commission Takes Two Steps Back

Blog entry by Duncan Williams | April 5, 2012

The week long meeting of the Pacific tuna commission (WCPFC) ended in what will be one of the worst outcomes for tuna conservation this commission has seen. After over a year of talks and advice from scientists concerned that...

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