Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.



Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.


Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.


The latest updates


Podcast:Apps for Activism and Fish Factory Trawlers

Blog entry by Mary Ambrose | March 2, 2015

Recently I read a story which I found truly shocking. It was about the sinking of a Korean fish factory trawler into the frigid depths of the Bering Sea off of Russia’s east coast. This particular fish factory trawler was on ...

Major breakthrough for Ocean Lovers: UN takes landmark step towards high seas...

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | January 27, 2015

It is time for Ocean Lovers worldwide to celebrate! After years of political foot-dragging, and four hectic days of   negotiations   at the United Nations, a   breakthrough   came in the wee hours of Saturday morning, 24 January:...

7 Resolutions for #OceanLovers

Blog entry by Veronica Frank | January 20, 2015

One week in to 2015, and even though some New Year’s resolutions will already have fallen by the wayside, we all need to urgently think about one more resolution:  The resolution to protect the oceans and all its beautiful whales,...

Monster boats: More than an environmental injustice

Blog entry by Angela Lazou Dean, Oceans Campaigner, Greenpeace G | December 2, 2014

Inspired by the touching stories of the small low impact fishers around the globe being impacted by monster boats, I recently decided to look into the definition of environmental justice. While I discovered that there is no...

A global day of oceanic solidarity

Blog entry by Nina Thuellen, EU fisheries project coordinator | November 21, 2014

Exactly one year ago I was privileged to attended the congress of European fishers using fishing gear with a low impact on marine life, and their brand new association L.I.F.E. (Low Impact Fishers of Europe) was officially...

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