Oceans

Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.

Tuna

Tuna

Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.

Supermarkets

Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.

 

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace activists show Loblaw how to remove Redlist species from their...

Feature story | November 19, 2008 at 17:00

Greenpeace activists took Loblaw by surprise today across the country by removing Redlist seafood species from the shelves and placing them in shopping carts draped with posters reading “Caught red-handed selling redlist fish.”

Whaling fleet attempts to sneak out of port

Feature story | November 16, 2008 at 17:00

Our activists marked the departure of Japan's whaling fleet from the port of Innoshima with banners declaring "Whaling on Trial" and another in Japanese outlining the whaling operation's multi-million dollar drain on Japan's taxpayers. The fleet...

Stop the bluefin tuna massacre

Feature story | November 16, 2008 at 17:00

Canada plays a key role in protecting the bluefin tuna, but needs to take a stronger position at the annual meeting of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) which opens today in Marrakech, says Greenpeace...

Reports: Japanese government gives in, slashes whale quotas

Feature story | November 12, 2008 at 17:00

Good news for the whales comes in threes. And then you get a dollop of extra. Asahi Shimbun, one of Japan's biggest newspapers, reports there will be a 20 percent reduction in the number of whales targeted in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary...

Greenpeace Opens its First Permanent African Offices

Feature story | November 12, 2008 at 17:00

Today Greenpeace opened its first permanent offices in Africa with a new continental headquarters in Johannesburg, South Africa and field offices in Kinchasa, Democratic Republic of Congo and Dakar, Senegal. Though campaigning in Africa for more...

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