Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.



Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.


Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.


The latest updates


Saving the last Japanese dugongs

Blog entry by Karli Thomas, Oceans Campaigner at Greenpeace NZ | November 6, 2015

The home of the last few Japanese dugongs is about to be landfilled to make way for two airstrips - part of the expansion of a US military base on the island of Okinawa. But a movement nearly 18 years old is standing up to say NO.

#NotJustTuna supplied by Thai Union Group to Trusted Brands and Companies

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | October 8, 2015

Is your company’s canned tuna supplied by Thai Union Group (Thai Union)? If so, consider this a warning. Greenpeace has launched a global campaign targeting the world’s largest producer of canned tuna for its shady and destructive...

5 Ways Seismic Blasting Threatens Whales

Blog entry by Farrah Khan, Arctic Campaigner | August 27, 2015 1 comment

We don’t have to look very far back in history to find proof of why offshore oil drilling is a dangerous endeavour. The BP oil blowout and  the Exxon-Valdez spill both left surrounding regions devastated and neither company was able to...

Acting for sharks, starting with your grocery list

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | July 8, 2015

This week is off to a sharktastic start with lots of jawsome shark facts, images, stories and sharkisms swimming around cyberspace. #Sharkweek is about getting to know this amazing creatures, sharing stories and inspiring people to...

We won! United Nations decide to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement

Blog entry by Sofia Tsenikli | June 22, 2015 1 comment

Only a few days ago - June 19th  -  the United Nations General Assembly formally decided to develop a High Seas Biodiversity Agreement, endorsing the breakthrough outcome of the UN biodiversity working group meeting in January. ...

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