Oceans

Life on our blue planet depends on healthy oceans, but recent reports warn that sea life faces the next mass extinction. Next to climate change, overfishing is the single greatest threat to marine biodiversity. Industrial fishing has reduced populations of large, predatory fish like tuna, cod and sharks by about ninety per cent in the last fifty years. Growing demand for seafood, wasteful fishing practices and mismanaged fish stocks and aquaculture operations are leading to broken links in marine food chains in Canadian waters and worldwide. Urgent action is needed to protect marine life and allow recovery. Greenpeace works to relieve pressure on ocean ecosystems and to establish a network of no-take marine reserves–ocean parks–covering 40 per cent of the world's oceans.

Tuna

Tuna

Greenpeace urges major canned tuna brands across the country to source only ocean-friendly tuna. Greenpeace also exposes brands unwilling to change their destructive ways. Tuna companies must stop sourcing tuna from overfished stocks and wasteful fisheries that kill far more than just the tuna in your can. Often sharks, rays, sea turtles and baby tuna from vulnerable stocks are caught through wasteful fishing methods. Much of the tuna on Canadian supermarket shelves is still caught by destructive methods, but a sea change is underway.Every year, Greenpeace ranks 14 of the largest tuna companies in Canada. See how they stack-up.

Supermarkets

Sustainable Seafood Markets

Greenpeace is calling on Canada’s major supermarkets to green how they source seafood and become ocean advocates. With sustainable seafood policies now in place with every major chain in Canada, Greenpeace pushes for an end to selling redlist seafood and irresponsible procurement practices. As the middlemen between consumers and seafood producers, supermarkets play a pivotal role in cleaning up the supply chain and pushing for positive change in our oceans.

 

The latest updates

 

My week on a plastic beach helping to name and shame its polluters

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | October 4, 2017

It was more devastating than I imagined, and that’s saying something considering the descriptions and pictures I’ve been exposed to over the years. The plastic pollution covering Freedom Island in Metro Manila, Philippines is...

Winning on the world’s largest tuna company and what it means for the oceans

Blog entry by Sarah King | July 11, 2017

It took two years of relentless campaigning and nearly 700,000 concerned people from around the world , but today we are sharing the good news that together we convinced the world’s largest tuna company to clean up its act! Tuna...

2017 Tuna Ranking reveals more green tuna products but not enough green tuna aisles

Blog entry by Sarah King, Senior oceans strategist | July 5, 2017 2 comments

Our 2017 Canned Tuna Sustainability Ranking is out and with it comes more intel than ever before about the state of canned tuna aisles in well-known supermarket chains across Canada. There’s some good and some bad news to share, but...

UPDATE: Towards #JustTuna: How a big Canadian brand is working to clean up its sourcing

Blog entry by Sarah King | June 5, 2017

Ocean Brands’ tuna commitment has been met! It’s been almost exactly a year since we posted the blog below with the news that Ocean Brands had announced bold and forward-looking commitments to be rolled out through its canned tuna...

Share Your Photos of Coke’s Plastic Pollution

Blog entry by Sarah King | May 29, 2017 1 comment

Coca-Cola is the biggest producer of plastic bottles in the world, producing over 100 billion plastic bottles every year. But Coke isn't taking responsibility for the huge amount of single-use plastic it’s producing - and...

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