Blogger profile

Rex Weyler

He was a photographer and reporter on the early Greenpeace whale and seal campaigns, and has written one of the best and most comprehensive histories of the organisation, Greenpeace (Raincoast, 2004). His book, Blood of the Land, a history of the American Indian Movement, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. 

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  • Ecology and Money

    Blogpost by Rex Weyler - October 8, 2015 at 9:18

    On Friday, September 17, the US Federal Reserve blinked in the face of unrelenting, global economic malaise. This private bank, which possesses the monopoly to print US money, had promised to raise interest rates a paltry 1/4-percent, after seven years of near-zero interest intended to revive the US economy. Corporations had used the free money to buy their own stocks, fattening their own net worth and boosting the US stock markets, but this "growth" was an illusion. Faced with mounting debt, crashing international markets, and national defaults in Europe, the bankers lost their nerve.

    Allotments in the Avanchets estate, Geneva, Switzerland. © Yan Arthus-BertrandA foodscaped neighbourhood: Ecological economics is possible, but it will be nothing like industrial economics. Avanchets estate, Geneva, Switzerland. © Yan Arthus-Bertrand

    One may fairly wonder: Who cares?... Read more >

  • The ninth extinction

    Blogpost by Rex Weyler - August 13, 2015 at 17:30

    Earth's living community is now suffering the most severe biodiversity crisis in 65 million years, since a meteorite struck near modern Chicxulub, Mexico, injecting dust and sulfuric acid into the atmosphere, and devastating 76% of all living species, including the dinosaurs.

    Ecologists now ask whether or not Earth has entered another "major" extinction event, if extinctions are as important as general diversity collapse, and which emergency actions we might take to reverse the disturbing trends.

    Underwater Life in Dry Tortugas National Park. 16 Aug, 2010 © Todd Warshaw / Greenpeace

    In 1972, at the first UN environmental conference in Stockholm, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich, linked the collapse of "organic diversity" to human population and industrial growth. In 1981, he published Extinction, explaining the causes and consequences of the biodiversity crisis and providin...

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  • Joni Mitchell: A tribute to the artist

    Blogpost by Rex Weyler - July 6, 2015 at 7:41

    On 31 March, 2015, Joni Mitchell – who helped launch Greenpeace with a 1970 benefit concert, and emerged as one of the greatest songwriters and performers of the last 50 years – experienced a brain aneurysm. Friends found her unconscious at her home in Los Angeles. She regained consciousness in the ambulance and entered intensive care at UCLA Medical Center. She was alert and communicating before and after treatment.

    "Joni is a strong-willed woman," her friend Leslie Morris said, "and is nowhere near giving up the fight." The public may send messages to Mitchell at We Love You, Joni!. Joni is now at home in Los Angeles and undergoing daily therapies. Although her condition is serious, a recovery is expected.

    Vulnerable young artist

    I first heard Joni Mitchell's music in the summer of 196...

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  • How do systems get unstuck?

    Blogpost by Rex Weyler - May 19, 2015 at 9:51

    Human enterprise appears stuck, like an addict, in habitual behaviour. We have plenty of data alerting us to global heating, declining species, disappearing forests, and rising toxins in our ecosystems. Yet, after decades of efforts to reverse these trends and some notable achievements — whaling moratorium, ocean dumping ban, renewable energy projects — the key trends appear evermore troubling. [1]

    In December, 2014, I attended a gathering hosted by the International Bateson Institute (IBI) and Centro Studi Riabilitzione Neurocognitiva Villa Miari, a clinic for paralysis patients in Schio, Italy. We observed therapeutic methods employed at Centro Studi to help us consider links between these methods and a efforts to address the ecological paralysis apparent in our social systems. "How ... Read more >

  • Are limits to growth real?

    Blogpost by Rex Weyler - January 19, 2015 at 14:18

    In 2002, global warming denialist and anti-environmental gadfly Bjørn Lomborg consigned the 1972 book, The Limits to Growth, to "the dustbin of history." However, 42 years of data now appear to vindicate the book’s premise, that the human enterprise must accept some limits on economic growth.

    Research published in 2014 by Dr. Graham Turner at the University of Melbourne shows that four decades of data track closely to the Limits "Business As Usual" (BAU) scenario, which they warned could lead to resource constrained economies and large-scale economic collapse in this century. The Limits authors did not make predictions; rather, they outlined possible futures and explained how those scenarios could arise, and what the consequences might be.

    In outlining the BAU scenario, the The Limits to ...

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