Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Global poll reveals huge majority support the creation of an Arctic sanctuary –...

Feature story | September 4, 2014 at 6:30

International polling revealed today that 74 percent of people worldwide support the creation of a protected sanctuary in the international waters surrounding the North Pole. In Canada, support for this enhanced form of protection ranks higher...

What do Margaret Atwood, Emma Thompson and David Suzuki have in common ?

Blog entry by Agnes Le Rouzic | August 12, 2014 1 comment

For some, the Arctic is a desert of ice lost in the North. For others, such as Shell, BP and Gazprom, the Canadian and Russian governments, it is an oil bonanza we have to go pump without further delay. But for the people in...

A recipe for Arctic protection

Blog entry by By Diego Creimer, Arctic communications officer | August 8, 2014

Since the dawn of human civilization, cooking and feasting together has been part of who we are as humans.  Around the fire, around the table, by gathering  and sharing food, women and men learned to live together and celebrate their...

Let's stop feeling so guilty about global warming

Blog entry by Emma Thompson | August 7, 2014 1 comment

Emma Thompson is currently in the Arctic aboard the Greenpeace ship Esperanza. She wrote these words after walking out onto the fragile sea ice for the first time alongside her 14 year old daughter Gaia. We're told that it is all...

Greatness begins within you

Blog entry by By Kiera-Dawn Kolson, Arctic campaigner | August 6, 2014

I didn’t grow up on a reservation. There aren’t many in the Northwest Territories. Still, when you come from a small community at the end of the road, and you’ve found yourself confused as to where your roots are -or even wonder why...

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