Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Latest score: Arctic 2 - Oil industry 0!

Blog entry by Truls Gulowsen | March 8, 2013

Shell’s spectacular series of mishaps in Alaska has definitely not been going down unnoticed in the oil industry. The Norwegian state-owned oil company Statoil is slowing down plans to drill for oil in US Arctic waters after Shell’s...

What does the giant Arctic camel tell us about climate change?

Blog entry by Ben Ayliffe | March 7, 2013

In my line of work the chances to flex my paleontological muscles are few and far between, which is why the news from scientists that they’ve discovered the remains of a giant camel that lived in Canada’s high Arctic millions of...

Shell's Arctic Failure Is Obama's Chance to Act

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | February 28, 2013

An unexpected thing happened last night: One of the biggest oil companies in the world -- Shell -- made a big decision acknowledging that the oil industry cannot operate safely in the Arctic. A decision that means one year of relief...

My love for the planet and why we must protect the Arctic

Feature story | February 28, 2013 at 7:00

*Les Stroud, a Canadian musician and the creator and star of Survivorman and Beyond Survival TV series with Les Stroud, is an engaged citizen who is committed to saving our planet. Using music and words , Stroud shares the origins of his...

Obama's climate legacy will start when Shell’s Arctic drilling stops

Blog entry by Ben Ayliffe | February 26, 2013

Since Shell's Kulluk rig ran aground off Alaska, the US Department of Interior and the US Coast Guard have both launched independent investigations to find out what went wrong with the company's drilling operations in the far north. ...

71 - 75 of 122 results.

Tags