Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace arrests show attempts to silence environmentalists continue

Blog entry by David Suzuki | November 27, 2013 7 comments

Early November marked the 18th anniversary of the tragic murder of outspoken writer and environmental activist Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight colleagues by the Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa and the others had waged a long campaign to stop...

Out of prison, but not yet free.

Blog entry by Sarah Wilbore | November 26, 2013

Last week in Russia was one of the best weeks in over two months. All of the Arctic 30 have been granted bail and released from prison in St. Petersburg. Already, heartwarming images are coming out of some of the emotional reunions...

Activists climb Montreal’s Biosphère in support of Arctic 30

Feature story | November 20, 2013 at 7:40

Greenpeace Canada hung a banner high on Montreal’s Biosphère early this morning as Nicole Paul, mother of one of the two Canadian activists jailed in Russia for protesting Arctic drilling, encouraged them from below.

Arctic 30 - 50 days of injustice in their own words

Blog entry by Esther Freeman | November 8, 2013

As we reach 50 days of detention of the Arctic 30, here is a collection of their tweets and letters, telling their story in their own words. "BREAKING: Helicopter hovering above Arctic Sunrise, rope dropping down. We think the...

Incredible new footage of the moment special forces boarded the Arctic Sunrise

Blog entry by Pete Speller | November 8, 2013 1 comment

We've just received incredible new footage that shows the moment Russian special forces abseiled onto the heli deck of the Arctic Sunrise and detained the crew at gun point. Email John Baird, Minister of Foreign...

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