Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Defend the Arctic and peaceful protest: get your Arctic 30 Solidarity Kit

Blog entry by Natalie Caine, Arctic Campaign | October 24, 2013 3 comments

It has been over a month since 28 Greenpeace activists and two freelance journalists were illegally detained in international waters by Russian authorities, following a peaceful protest to stop destructive oil drilling in the Arctic. ...

Don’t believe the hype – hooliganism is hardly better than piracy

Blog entry by Jess Wilson | October 23, 2013

Earlier this evening Russian authorities offered the Arctic 30 — currently being held in a freezing jail in Murmansk — what looked like a legal olive branch by dropping piracy charges and replacing them with ones of "hooliganism." ...

30 things you can do for the Arctic 30

Blog entry by JulietteH | October 17, 2013 3 comments

We continue to be overwhelmed by the amount of support, messages, letters, posters, sent to us for the Arctic 30. Many of you have written to us asking what more you can do to help them, especially when you are far away from cities...

Our Captain Fantastic

Blog entry by Bunny McDiarmid | October 14, 2013

Pete Willcox, who has just been refused bail and remains alone in a Russian jail cell, was my skipper on board the first Rainbow Warrior in 1984. As a crew we spent five months in a hellhole boat yard in Florida turning  the...

Arctic Ambassadors campaign across Canada to Save the Arctic

Blog entry by Natalie Caine | October 10, 2013

In August, Greenpeace posed a challenge to our supporters across Canada.  We asked them to step up to our Arctic Ambassador Petition Competition , becoming campaigners for the Arctic and growing our movement in their own networks...

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