Arctic

© Greenpeace / Christian Åslund

What at the first glance looks like a cold and barren north is really a treasure of life and beauty, home to people and amazing wildlife.

The Arctic and subarctic regions are home to approximately 30 different peoples with unique cultures and traditions. The Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic, many of them called Inuit, inhabit the most northern regions of North America, Asia and Greenland. Although modern times have changed the everyday life in the Arctic, people in the region still live in very close connection with and depend on their natural environment and the Arctic wildlife.

Walruses, narwhals and polar bears are possibly the most iconic animals to be found in the Arctic, and they provide examples of how beautiful, unique and diverse the Arctic wildlife is. Life in the Arctic forms a complex and sensitive ecosystem. Canada’s Arctic sector covers 1,425,000 square kilometers and is home to many Inuit, First Nations, Dene, Métis and non-Indigenous communities. After Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago is the world’s largest high-Arctic land area.

But the Arctic is not only home to people and wildlife. It affects the lives of many even far away. By regulating our climate and reflecting much of the sunlight back into space, the Arctic acts like a refrigerator for the northern hemisphere and strongly influences weather patterns all around the world.

Rising temperatures caused by climate change rapidly alter the face of the Arctic, bringing new risks and big challenges for the environment and wildlife, as well as for people in the Arctic and all around the world.

Greenpeace has mobilized over five million people to take a stand and help ensure the protection this frozen treasure so desperately needs. For more information: SavetheArctic.org

The latest updates

 

Is there a future for Greenland without Arctic oil?

Blog entry by Jon Burgwald | March 17, 2014

For the past four years I've been visiting the beautiful country of Greenland, trying to prevent dangerous oil drilling that would cause havoc to the unique and fragile wildlife and nature here. But ever since I started working in...

The European Parliament backs our vision for an Arctic sanctuary

Blog entry by Neil Hamilton | March 12, 2014

Tonight I’ll sleep well, knowing that there is finally something happening within the international community about protecting the Arctic. It’s not going to change things overnight, but it’s very positive, and something that our...

Shell's Arctic albatross

Blog entry by James Turner | January 30, 2014

'God save thee, ancient Mariner! From the fiends, that plague thee thus! Why look'st thou so?' 'With my cross-bow I shot the Albatross.' Samuel Taylor Coleridge The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, 1798 A little over ten...

You can’t sink a rainbow, you can’t seize a sunrise

Blog entry by Alex Harris | January 22, 2014

All rights reserved . Credit: © John Cobb / Greenpeace. Alex Harris at the Greenpeace office in London I trembled as I walked through the grounds of Murmansk prison on the 26th September. Inmates watched...

Canadian Greenpeace activists held in Russia for three months arrive home

Feature story | December 27, 2013 at 14:36

The final scene of a near hundred day saga is taking place this weekend as Canadian activists Paul Ruzycki and Alexandre Paul return to Canada after being held in Russia for more than three months following a peaceful protest at an Arctic oil...

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