The Rainbow Warrior in Mumbai waters

About Greenpeace India:

Greenpeace India was founded in 2001, and is a legally registered society with offices in Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Patna, Kolkata, Pune, Hyderabad and Chennai. We have an Indian board of governors made up of notable Indian citizens and an Indian Senior Management Team (SMT) who lead an organisation of 350 (approx.) Indian staff.

Greenpeace India does not accept donations from governments or corporations, and relies on the donations of 77,000+ Indian citizens to fund our campaign work. In addition we are supported by a national network of Indian volunteers and 11 lakh online and 18 lakh mobile activists [2015]. We have an annual income of around 17 Crore Rs.

Greenpeace India campaigns to protect India’s forests, for clean air and water, to promote solar power, to prevent the dangerous impacts of climate change and nuclear power, for safe food and ecological farming and to protect freedom of speech. We also provide tools and resources for you to plan your own campaigns on issues you care about.

Greenpeace India is an independent organisation connected to a network of other Greenpeace offices in over 55 countries. We share the name, vision and our belief in non-violence, personal action, bearing witness, global solutions and financial independence. Please get involved.

About Greenpeace:

Greenpeace started in 1971 with a small group of volunteers organising a music concert to raise funds to sail a boat from Vancouver to Amchitka to protest against US militarism and the testing of nuclear weapons. The tests went ahead but the protests gave birth to a new idea – Greenpeace.

44 years on each Greenpeace office decides its own campaign priorities working together to create a global framework;

  1. Catalysing an energy revolution to address the number one threat facing our planet: climate change. In India we actively campaign to promote solar power.
  2. Defending our oceans by challenging wasteful and destructive fishing, and creating a global network of marine reserves.
  3. Protecting the world’s ancient forests the animals, plants and people that depend on them. In India we have successfully campaigned to protect the forests of Mahan.
  4. Working for disarmament and peace by tackling the causes of conflict and calling for the elimination of all nuclear weapons.
  5. Creating a toxic free future with safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals in today's products and manufacturing. In India we actively campaign to reduce dangerous air pollution and to deal with urban waste.
  6. Campaigning for sustainable agriculture by rejecting genetically engineered organisms, protecting biodiversity and encouraging socially responsible farming. In India we actively campaign to promote ecological farming, living soils, safe food and to reduce the use of pesticides in our food and tea.

As a global network we do not believe that environmental problems stop at national boundaries. However in India we perhaps focus more on local environmental problems than other offices. There are plenty of domestic issues that need your and our support - India’s national problems are often global in scale. We’re a big nation and we need the help of people like you more than ever - please get involved.

The latest updates

 

Forest Community Rights

Image gallery | October 15, 2012

Forest Community Rights

Image gallery | October 15, 2012

Countering Coal

Publication | October 15, 2012 at 14:30

This report exposes the environmental damage and human rights violations against tribal and other forest dwellers in the forests of Singrauli in Madhya Pradesh, that are under threat from the Indian government’s massive coal expansion programme.

As an Indian, I speak out against Coal Crimes

Blog entry by Amala Akkineni | October 15, 2012

'Lights, camera, action' are three words I have become used to in my professional career. If my stint at Charminar is anything to go by, then 'Arrested 'is going to be a new phrase I will become accustomed to as an activist with...

Pick tigers over coal

Blog entry by Vinuta Gopal | October 12, 2012

Few countries can boast a national animal with the status as India. The tiger, as a symbol of India, is as recognisable as the Taj Mahal and as loved as Mahatma Gandhi. Yet this iconic emblem of India is under threat and perhaps most...

India must get its own house in order on biodiversity

Blog entry by Vanessa Atkinson | October 11, 2012

It's hard to throw a party and expect your guests to behave better than you do. Yet that is exactly what the Indian government is doing as it hosts a major international conference on biodiversity in Hyderabad. There's a word for that...

CBD media briefing

Publication | October 11, 2012 at 11:13

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), with its 193 parties or delegates is the globe’s most important conference on protecting the planet’s diminishing biodiversity – It is the conference that covers life on earth and the use of the...

Children of Koodankulam

Blog entry by Ali Abbas | October 9, 2012

September 25, 2012 Today, rather than sleeping in the parish house I decided to sleep with protestors under the pandal.  The young men sleep around the border of the pandal to protect the women and children in case there is an...

Actress Amala Akkineni protests with Greenpeace from Charminar

Feature story | October 8, 2012 at 19:00

The Charminar, was the venue Greenpeace activists chose in Hyderabad to protest against coal mining destroying forests in Central India. On October 8, the first day of the Convention on Biological Diversity being held in the city, activists...

'Stop Coal Crime' action in Hyderabad

Image gallery | October 8, 2012

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