The Rainbow Warrior in Mumbai waters

About Greenpeace India:

Greenpeace India was founded in 2001, and is a legally registered society with offices in Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Patna, Kolkata, Pune, Hyderabad and Chennai. We have an Indian board of governors made up of notable Indian citizens and an Indian Senior Management Team (SMT) who lead an organisation of 350 (approx.) Indian staff.

Greenpeace India does not accept donations from governments or corporations, and relies on the donations of 77,000+ Indian citizens to fund our campaign work. In addition we are supported by a national network of Indian volunteers and 11 lakh online and 18 lakh mobile activists [2015]. We have an annual income of around 17 Crore Rs.

Greenpeace India campaigns to protect India’s forests, for clean air and water, to promote solar power, to prevent the dangerous impacts of climate change and nuclear power, for safe food and ecological farming and to protect freedom of speech. We also provide tools and resources for you to plan your own campaigns on issues you care about.

Greenpeace India is an independent organisation connected to a network of other Greenpeace offices in over 55 countries. We share the name, vision and our belief in non-violence, personal action, bearing witness, global solutions and financial independence. Please get involved.

About Greenpeace:

Greenpeace started in 1971 with a small group of volunteers organising a music concert to raise funds to sail a boat from Vancouver to Amchitka to protest against US militarism and the testing of nuclear weapons. The tests went ahead but the protests gave birth to a new idea – Greenpeace.

44 years on each Greenpeace office decides its own campaign priorities working together to create a global framework;

  1. Catalysing an energy revolution to address the number one threat facing our planet: climate change. In India we actively campaign to promote solar power.
  2. Defending our oceans by challenging wasteful and destructive fishing, and creating a global network of marine reserves.
  3. Protecting the world’s ancient forests the animals, plants and people that depend on them. In India we have successfully campaigned to protect the forests of Mahan.
  4. Working for disarmament and peace by tackling the causes of conflict and calling for the elimination of all nuclear weapons.
  5. Creating a toxic free future with safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals in today's products and manufacturing. In India we actively campaign to reduce dangerous air pollution and to deal with urban waste.
  6. Campaigning for sustainable agriculture by rejecting genetically engineered organisms, protecting biodiversity and encouraging socially responsible farming. In India we actively campaign to promote ecological farming, living soils, safe food and to reduce the use of pesticides in our food and tea.

As a global network we do not believe that environmental problems stop at national boundaries. However in India we perhaps focus more on local environmental problems than other offices. There are plenty of domestic issues that need your and our support - India’s national problems are often global in scale. We’re a big nation and we need the help of people like you more than ever - please get involved.

The latest updates


A Forest Conservation Policy

Image gallery | February 4, 2013

Supreme Court questions Centre's right to allocate coal blocks

Blog entry by Ignatius Thekaekara | January 25, 2013

Stay up-to-date on news related to the environment. The Supreme Court has questioned the Central government’s authority to allocate coal blocks to companies and has sought legal explanation as the statutory Act empowers only the...

Point of No Return in pictures

Feature story | January 22, 2013 at 1:00

The world is quickly reaching a point of no return for preventing the worst impacts of climate change. Continuing on the current course will make it difficult, if not impossible, to prevent the widespread and catastrophic impacts of climate...

PM calls environmental clearances the new ‘licence-permit-quota raj’

Blog entry by Ignatius Joseph | January 17, 2013

Stay up-to-date on news related to the environment. PM calls environmental clearances the new ‘licence-permit-quota raj’ At the Union Cabinet meeting on January 10 Prime Minister Manmohan Singh stated that environmental...

When humans take over. The story of Uttrakhand

Blog entry by Bipasha Majumder | January 15, 2013

Imagine a place with green rugged hills, deep valleys, sparkling blue rivers, apple and cherry orchards, sleepy little towns and villages and friendly and humble people. Travel further up and let this place open up to the ever...

Governments must confront climate change in 2013

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | January 13, 2013

Blog also published on the Guardian's Sustainable Business Blog. I hope I am wrong. But in 2013, we can expect to witness more devastating extreme weather events, fuelled and supercharged by the destructive power of a warming...

Water woes: when every drop counts

Blog entry by Dr Pallavi Singh | January 8, 2013

As a child I once came across this phrase 'Water water everywhere, not a single drop to drink'. Though always amused, my young mind could never quite envisage the gravity of the above lines. Years later, I can perhaps now imagine how...

8 reasons why Shell can't be trusted in the Arctic

Blog entry by franziska_g | January 7, 2013

Shell's most recent 'mishap' a few days ago was not the first setback the oil giant has suffered in its plans to drill for oil in the Arctic. In fact, it's the eighth in a growing list of reasons why Shell should not be trusted in the...

The climate change story at Angkor Photo Festival

Blog entry by John Novis | December 4, 2012

Tonight, on a very warm evening in Siem Reap, Cambodia I gave my presentation at the Angkor Photo Festival as part of their nightly slide show screenings.  The setting was the gardens of the famous Foreign Correspondence Club, a site...

Convention on Biological Diversity: whimper rather than a bang

Blog entry by Abhishek Srivastavaa | October 24, 2012

The world gathered in India last week, with almost 15,000 delegates from 193 nations enraptured in chalking out a plan to tackle the decline in biodiversity by 2020. The summit seemed too big to fail, especially considering the...

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