Hundreds of people stranded on a beach with fires raging in the background. Millions of hectares of the forest turning into ashes overnight. The loss of about a billion wildlife in just a few months. 

All of these tragedies point to an emergency, a serious climate emergency, so let’s not shy away from accepting or responding to it. We have gone way past the discussion stages, and actions need to happen immediately and quickly. 

Have a look at these images below. They bear witness to the large-scale catastrophe that has been happening during the last few months in Australia. 

Australians on January 5 counted the cost from a day of catastrophic bushfires that caused “extensive damage” across swathes of the country and took the death toll from the long-running crisis to 24. © SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images
Bushfires burn between the townships of Bemm River and Cann River in eastern Gippsland on January 02, 2020, Australia. The HMAS Choules docked outside of Mallacoota this morning to evacuate thousands of people stranded in the remote coastal town following fires across East Gippsland which have killed one person and destroyed dozens of properties. © Darrian Traynor/Getty Images
Thick smoke from bushfires fills the air in eastern Gippsland on January 02, 2020, Australia. The HMAS Choules docked outside of Mallacoota this morning to evacuate thousands of people stranded in the remote coastal town following fires across East Gippsland which have killed one person and destroyed dozens of properties. © Darrian Traynor/Getty Images
A kangaroo jumps in a field amidst smoke from a bushfire in Snowy Valley on the outskirts of Cooma on January 4, 2020. – Up to 3,000 military reservists were called up to tackle Australia’s relentless bushfire crisis on January 4, as tens of thousands of residents fled their homes amid catastrophic conditions. © SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images
A state of emergency is in place across NSW as firefighters work to contain multiple fires, 13 of which are at emergency level. Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Saturday announced that army reservists were being called up to help with firefighting efforts across Australia, along with extra ships and helicopters. 13 people have died in the fires in NSW, Victoria and South Australia since New Year’s Eve. © Brett Hemmings/Getty Images
A military helicopter flies above a burning woodchip mill in Eden, in Australia’s New South Wales state on January 6, 2020. © SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images
A signing warning of the presence of kangaroos in burnt-out bush in Conjola Park, on the New South Wales south coast, after the area was decimated by bushfire on Saturday, January 4. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace
Dr Caitlin McFadden, a local veterinarian from the nearby Milton Veterinary clinic with a Brush tail possum badly burned by bushfires on Saturday January 4 that she takes home from the clinic to care for each night. She names the possum Ambo, after the paramedics who rescued him from burnt-out bush in the days following the firestorm. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace
A kangaroo that was euthanised by a local wildlife rescue volunteer who requested to be identified only as Trev, with burnt pads on its hind legs caused by bushfire in Conjola Park, on the New South Wales south coast, after the area was decimated by bushfire on Saturday January 4. Before being euthanised, it was assessed that the kangaroo was too badly injured to recover from its injures, which would likely become infected, causing a slow, painful death. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace
Destroyed cars and property in Conjola Park, on the New South Wales south coast, after the area was decimated by bushfire on Saturday January 4. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace
A blackened landscape in Morton, on the New South Wales south coast, after the area was decimated by bushfire on Saturday January 4. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace
Burnt-out bush in the Murramarang National Park on the New South Wales south coast. © Andrew Quilty / Greenpeace