The Climate Change and Human Rights Inquiry in the Philippines is the world’s first investigation into corporate responsibility for the climate crisis. 

It was launched by the Philippines Commission on Human Rights (CHR) soon after typhoon survivors and civil society groups filed a complaint before the Commission in September 2015, calling for a probe into the possible human rights violations of the 47 biggest fossil fuel and cement companies (“Carbon Majors”) resulting from climate change. 

A series of public inquiry hearings took place in Manila, New York, and London, which yielded in thousands of pages of documentary and testimonial evidence presented by Filipino and international science, policy, and legal experts, and narratives of individuals from different communities  whose lives have been hugely affected by climate change.

The CHR’s national inquiry has clearly shown  that people affected by climate change and whose human rights have been dramatically harmed must have access to remedies, and access to justice. Simply put, the Carbon Majors  and other corporations have responsibilities to protect human rights as we face the climate emergency.

The petitioners and climate advocates around the world are awaiting the outcome of the landmark inquiry in 2020. 

I. Memorandum and Annexes

II. Petition and Annexes

III. Corporate Responses and Comments on the Petition

IV. Petitioners’ Consolidated Reply

V. Corporate Rejoinders to the Consolidated Reply

VI. Commission on Human Rights’ Notice for companies to attend preliminary conference of parties

VII. CHR Releases Related to the Case

VIII. Statements and Documentary Exhibits of Resource Persons

IX. Video Recordings of Inquiry Hearings

X. Closing Statement for the Petitioners

XI. Commission on Human Rights’ Consultation of Experts (Netherlands)

XII. Local Government Units’ Resolutions Supporting the Climate Change & Human Rights Petition

XIII. CHR Inquiry Hearings Official TSNs

XIV. Amicus Briefs Submitted to the Philippines Commission on Human Rights