Mumbai 20th March 2018| Seven climbers climbed the Vashi Bridge by pinning a banner of hope towards cleaning up Mumbai’s air. The 60 ft x 22ft foot banner said “Mumbai Clean Air Now!”. The banner on the busy Vashi bridge, which sees thousands of vehicles passing daily was to symbolise the impact of emissions from vehicles on our air quality.

Simultaneously, in Delhi, environmental activists from different social background held a protest outside Badarpur Power Plant which has been shut down multiple times due to pollution issue and has become symbol of fight against air pollution. The twin cities protest was to mark the solidarity and uniting people towards momentum against air pollution. Seven clean air enthusiasts showing their true grit climbed the Vashi Bridge with a message of urging to “Mumbai Clean Air Now”.

The protest were for reminding the MoEF&CC for an immediate enforcement of the National Clean Air Program by making it public and putting sector wise plan to achieve 35% emission reduction in three years in public domain.

The activities in Delhi and Mumbai are towards highlighting the impacts of one of the biggest sources of air pollution fossil fuels (coal and petroleum oil)

Deven Arya, Climber & Activist said “when I think of impact of air pollution, how it is adversely impacting us gives me courage to stand up and be the part of Clean Air Movement. I have read situation being bad in Delhi but earlier this year also witnessed smog in Mumbai as well, I can’t imagine wearing a mask everyday at work, so I had to do something. Our state government must formulate a clean air action plan to win this battle against smog”

Greenpeace India Airpocalypse II report highlighted earlier that 6.7 million children under 5 years of age live in districts exceeding the national ambient air quality standards across Maharashtra with another 2.6 million living where there is no data on the status of air quality.

Akshay Gupta, Campaigner, Greenpeace India said “The situation of air pollution is increasingly deteriorating in the state of Maharashtra. With only 16% of the population living in areas having availability of real time air quality data shows how casually the state is handling the air pollution crisis, leave aside the concrete action plans to reduce the hazardous air pollution levels.”

The fact that none of the 24 cities across Maharashtra are complying to the annual PM10 air quality standards set by CPCB should become a matter of concern before Mumbai turns into another Delhi. “Mumbai should lead by examples not on the lists of most polluted and unhealthy cities to live in, but in being the city where clean air, environment and health is prioritized. Mumbaikars must demand for transparent publicly available and robust Action Plan to reduce air pollution in alignment with National Clean Air Program but with more specific actions across sectors., concludes Akshay.

Link to photographs: (Delhi & Mumbai)  http://media.greenpeace.org/collection/27MZIFJXMY6VY

For further  details:
Jitendra Kumar, Senior Media Specialist,
9868167337, jkumar@greenpeace.org

Madhulika Verma, Senior Media Specialist,
9971137736,  mverma@greenpeace.org

Akshay Gupta, Campaigner;
+91 9650930777;  akshay.gupta@greenpeace.org