Fishing is changing the world's oceans in ways scientists can not fully understand. We may only learn about the nature and extent of the damage after it is too late to do anything to stop it.

A Fishy Story

Beneath the serene beauty of our ocean waters lurks a nightmare worse than any Jaws movie. You could compare it to alien abduction - massive numbers of fish are being snatched out of the water by high-tech factory fishing trawlers. This nightmare scenario is real, and the impacts on our ocean's ecosystems are extensive. Entire populations of fish are being targeted and destroyed, disrupting the food chain from top to bottom.

A Tiny Example of an Enormous Problem

Throughout the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding Atlantic waters, there lives a fish near the bottom of the food chain: it's called the menhaden. It's not a glamorous or beautiful fish, but this tiny creature supports an entire food chain that leads all the way up to whales in the Atlantic Ocean. And it is disappearing.

This once abundant fish has become the symbol of overfishing, and its loss could have a dramatic impact on our oceans.

If the menhaden is the symbol of overfishing, the Omega Protein company has become the symbol of corporate greed and excess in the fishing community. Omega's high-tech factory ships have been locating menhaden schools and literally vacuuming them out of the water.

The fishiest part of this story is that it is just one example of many in our oceans today.

This summer, Greenpeace is focussing on a tiny fish in the Chesapeake Bay, to demonstrate a worldwide problem facing our oceans. Join us on our voyage to save the oceans.

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace activists protest fish farming

Image | July 10, 2004 at 19:00

Greenpeace activists protest fish farming in British Columbia

The Arctic Sunrise was once a sealing vessel

Image | June 22, 2004 at 19:00

The Arctic Sunrise was once a sealing vessel.

The Esperanza is spanish for "hope."

Image | June 22, 2004 at 19:00

The Esperanza is spanish for "hope."

Sonic Impact: A Precautionary Assessment of Noise Pollution from Ocean Seismic Surveys

Publication | June 3, 2004 at 18:00

This 2004 Greenpeace report provides data on seismic testing and the impacts on ocean creatures. Greenpeace advocates that until more is known about the dangers caused by noise pollution, the U.S. government and corporations must act in the best...

Exploit, Deplete and Move On...

Feature story | April 13, 2004 at 18:00

The Canadian government has approved a massive expansion in the allowable catch for harp seals in Canada to a maximum of 350,000 animals in 2004. While "whitecoat" harp seals (under two weeks old) are still protected as a result of actions by...

Following in the Footsteps of Exxon Valdez

Feature story | November 12, 2003 at 18:00

Almost 15 years ago, the Exxon Valdez made headlines by spilling more than 11 million gallons of oil off the coast of Alaska. Since this disaster, little has been done to ensure the tragedy would not be repeated. In 2002, an even bigger spill...

The Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources

Publication | August 25, 2003 at 18:00

CCAMLR is responsible for fisheries management in the Southern Ocean. The Convention came into force in 1982. While the objectives of CCAMLR are good, it has proven incapable of enforcing conservation and management measures to protect the...

The Albatross: End of the Line?

Publication | August 25, 2003 at 18:00

The threat of pirate fishing on the albatross is well documented and some governments have recently taken some small steps to address the problem. However the steps that are being taken will not be enough to prevent the imminent biological...

Surf and Turf: Corporate Control of our Food Supply

Publication | August 25, 2003 at 18:00

The world fishing industry has been transformed by transnational corporate control, factory trawlers, value-added commercialism and Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQs).

Pirates Plunder Southern Ocean Biodiversity

Publication | August 25, 2003 at 18:00

The most blatant cause of global overfishing and waste is the unregulated growth and expansion of large-scale, capital- and technology-intensive fishing vessels.

681 - 690 of 706 results.

Topics