Why this matters

The Problem

The Amazon is the biggest remaining rainforest on Earth. It’s a biodiversity hotspot and has a crucial role for the world’s climate in storing 80 to 120 billion tonnes of carbon. Hundreds of local and Indigenous communities live in the Amazon of Brazil, Peru and Ecuador. They hold the key to end deforestation and protect the rainforest. Only if forest destruction is detected and reported timely way, can those behind it be held accountable.

In the Amazon, people and environment are under pressure as never before. The hunt for natural resources such as timber, oil, minerals and expanding soy plantations for livestock production are an enormous threat to the rainforest and the planet, and therefore to all of us. Deforestation and forest destruction go hand in hand with violence and puts Indigenous and local communities and their way of living at risk. They are real heroes as they are standing strong against a powerful logging and agriculture industry. They are the guardians of the Amazon. We stand in solidarity with them.

What you can do

Learn more about the guardians of the Amazon
1
2
3
Get to know the Karipuna
Learn more about the threat deforestation poses
Get to know the All eyes on the Amazon project

The Karipuna are one of the Indigenous communities living in and from the forest in the Brazilian state of Rondônia. We met them in their village in the heart of the Amazon.

Due to various forms of fraud that are common at the licensing, harvesting and commercialisation stages of timber production, it is almost impossible to distinguish between legally and illegally logged timber from the Brazilian Amazon.

This unique project combines state-of-the-art technologies, such as drones and satellite - based mapping, with the expertise of 11 organisations in the fields of human rights, environment, technology and law enforcement.

1 Get to know the Karipuna

The Karipuna are one of the Indigenous communities living in and from the forest in the Brazilian state of Rondônia. We met them in their village in the heart of the Amazon.

Meet the Karipuna

Due to various forms of fraud that are common at the licensing, harvesting and commercialisation stages of timber production, it is almost impossible to distinguish between legally and illegally logged timber from the Brazilian Amazon.

Read the report

This unique project combines state-of-the-art technologies, such as drones and satellite - based mapping, with the expertise of 11 organisations in the fields of human rights, environment, technology and law enforcement.

Check it out!