Free tickets to award-winning documentary “Chasing Ice”

by Cassady Sharp

November 8, 2012

CLICK HERE TO CHASE ICE

[caption id="attachment_12626" align="alignright" width="600" caption="A young polar bear (Ursus maritimus) wanders on ice, seen from the Greenpeace ship during an expedition to document the lowest sea ice level on record."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_12622" align="alignright" width="300" caption="In Disko Bay, Greenland, 20-story high icebergs broken off from the Greenland Ice Sheet float into the North Atlantic, raising sea level"][/caption] Many of us may never get the chance to travel to the top of the world. Yet similar to the places often unseen, the Arctic needs our help. During our most recent Arctic excursion, a crewmember called the Arctic a "big air conditioner."That's because the sea ice in the Arctic regulates our global climate by reflecting sunlight. That ice is melting at a rapid rate meaning the ocean absorbs the sunlight resulting in a warmer earth. This of course causes more sea ice to melt. Sounds like a vicious cycle, huh? Not only does the Arctic work to regulate the global climate, it's also home to a rich ecosystem and indigenous people who depend on that ecosystem. Polar bears, seals, walruses and whales are just some of the species that call the Arctic home. And it's all in danger. [caption id="attachment_12623" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Chasing Ice Director Jeffery Orlowski shooting in Uummannaq, Greenland, Summer of 2007."][/caption] In the spring of 2005, National Geographic photographer James Balog headed to the Arctic on a tricky assignment: to capture images to help tell the story of the Earths changing climate. Even with a scientific upbringing, Balog had been a skeptic about climate change and a cynic about the nature of academic research. But that first trip north opened his eyes to the biggest story in human history and sparked a challenge within him that would put his career and his very well-being at risk. Chasing Ice is the story of one mans mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the worlds changing glaciers. The film has already won several international film awards including Best Documentaryfrom the Environmental Media Association and the Excellence in Cinematography at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Greenpeace has got 100 free tickets for our supports to go see this incredible documentary in a city near you. CLICK HERE to claim your free ticket now! Just remember to write "greenpeace" in the group code category. Not all of us can make it to the far regions of the world to see this beautiful and vulnerable places. Let Chasing Ice take you there.Watch the trailer for the film below and don't forget to claim your free ticket! The first showing is this Friday in New York with showings all across the country in the next few weeks. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIZTMVNBjc4

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