Dunkin’ Brands Palm Oil Commitment

by Joao Talocchi

September 16, 2014

The Tambling Wildlife Nature Conservation area is part of the South Bukit Barisan National Park. The forest is located on the southern tip of Sumatra Island and it is a remote area where no public transportation is available.

© Paul Hilton / Greenpeace

It’s the sugar, the calories, the oil, the tigers…

For a lot of people, eating a doughnut can carry a lot of guilt. But in 2016, American customers of Dunkin’ Brands’ products will be able to drop at least one of them. Today, after being pressured by various organizations, the company announced a new commitmentto break the links between the oil it uses to fry some of its doughnuts and the destruction of tropical forests.

This allows Dunkin’ Brands to join the group of US and international consumer facing companies that have made similar pledges since the beginning of the year, as P&G, Colgate, DelHaize, Mars and others.

Dunkin’ pledged to protect forests for its biodiversity and social values, as well as their carbon stocks, adopting clear definitions of what they expect from their suppliers and a clear timeline for compliance in the US. We hope this sends a strong message to the palm oil producers and traders that continue to clear forests.

But while Dunkin’will bring this piece of mind to its UScustomers, elsewhere clients will continue to wonder if the sweet dough is filled with tiger extinction or not. The company claims a target for its international operations will be set by March 2015. With only about 400 Sumatran Tigers left in the wild, any extra time is too much time.

One of my colleagues in Indonesia framed it well. She was glad to see the company adopting a policy to protect the forests of Indonesia, but was wondering when Indonesians – not only Americans – will be able to enjoy doughnuts that are not contributing to the destruction of their forests.

Until then – and even after – there’s Durian!

Durian, the Indo-Malaysian King of fruits, is a controversial delicacy. It  smell is so strong the fruit has been forbidden from some hotels and  trains. At the same time, it is incredibly delicious. As put by Wallace, on The Malay Archipelago "as producing a food of the most exquisite flavor it is unsurpassed".

Durian, the South East Asian”King of Fruits”, is a controversial delicacy. It smell is so strong the fruit has been forbidden from some hotels and trains. At the same time, it is incredibly delicious. As put by Wallace, on The Malay Archipelago “as producing a food of the most exquisite flavor it is unsurpassed”.

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